The Little Red Hen by Jerry Pinkney
(Phyllis Fogelman Books)

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Synopsis

Caldecott Medal winner Jerry Pinkney enlivens the beloved fable with cheerful and classically beautiful illustrations, making this the ideal edition for every child’s library.
 
As he did with his Caldecott-winning The Lion and the Mouse, Jerry Pinkney has masterfully adapted this story of the hardworking hen and her lazy neighbors. Its Golden Rule message and sassy finale are just as relevant and satisfying as ever. Read it in tandem with Pinkney’s Puss in Boots and The Tortoise and the Hare or David Wiesner’s The Three Pigs.
 
 
"Perfect [for] sharing with one listener, or a crowd." —Kirkus Reviews (starred review)
 
“Cheerful [and] luminous. Kids will gleefully chime in.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review)
 
“A lush light-filled rendition of a folktale staple.”—School Library Journal (starred review)

 

About Jerry Pinkney

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Jerry Pinkney is one of America's most admired children's book illustrators. He has won the Caldecott Medal and five Caldecott Honor Medals, five Coretta Scott King Awards, five New York Times Ten Best Illustrated Awards, the Society of Illustrators' Original Art Show Lifetime Achievement Award, and many other prizes and honors. Recently a member of the National Council of the Arts and inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he has also served on the U.S. Postal Service Citizens Stamp Advisory Committee. His artwork has been exhibited in galleries and museums throughout the country, including the Art Institute of Chicago, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Schomburg Center, and the Norman Rockwell Museum. Jerry Pinkney lives with his wife, author Gloria Jean Pinkney, in Westchester County, New York.
 
Published May 18, 2006 by Dial. 32 pages
Genres: Nature & Wildlife, Children's Books.

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Little Red Hen

Kirkus Reviews

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Her folk-art images cleverly use ovoid shapes as a motif throughout (portrait insets of the animals, for instance) and imaginatively depict how the hen carries out each step, e.g., she uses her beak to cut the wheat and to hold a wooden spoon to stir the batter.

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Kirkus Reviews

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In this pointed retelling of the familiar tale, Pinkney expands the cast by giving the industrious title bird a bevy of chicks, plus not three but four indolent animal neighbors, all of which are drawn naturalistically and to scale in big, comical farmyard watercolors.

Jun 24 2010 | Read Full Review of The Little Red Hen (Phyllis F...

Publishers Weekly

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In a Central African tale that turns the story of the Little Red Hen upside down, an affectionate chicken mother fails to build her children a better house, and one of her chicks must do it instead.

Dec 17 2012 | Read Full Review of The Little Red Hen (Phyllis F...

Publishers Weekly

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After climbing into a bird’s nest (a nod to “Rock-a-Bye, Baby,” per Pinkney’s artist’s note) that transforms into a boat, the chipmunk, now wearing a sailor suit, sails into the darkening sky in a dreamlike journey that later has him tumbling into a pond and being rescued by a swan.

Aug 29 2011 | Read Full Review of The Little Red Hen (Phyllis F...

Publishers Weekly

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Produced in the same generous format as Pinkney's (The Ugly Duckling ) previous retellings of classic tales, this inviting work opens with a view of the heroine's mother posed very much like Whistler's mother, stitching a certain red cloak as a small window shows snow falling.

Oct 01 2007 | Read Full Review of The Little Red Hen (Phyllis F...

Publishers Weekly

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Other than some squeaks, hoots and one enormous roar, Pinkney's (Little Red Riding Hood ) interpretation of Aesop's fable is wordless—as is its striking cover, which features only a head-on portrait of the lion's face.

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Publishers Weekly

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"In this faithful retelling of the classic tale, Pinkney transports the heroine from Andersen's European setting to the bustling city streets and crowded tenements of early 1920s America," said PW in a starred review.

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Publishers Weekly

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Caldecott Honor artist Pinkney puts a sprightly spin on this classic tale with resplendent artwork that comically conveys the title character's energy—and her barnyard colleagues' slo

Jun 05 2006 | Read Full Review of The Little Red Hen (Phyllis F...

Common Sense Media

With art like this to his name, it's no surprise that Jerry Pinkney has won five Caldecott Medals, five Coretta Scott King Awards, and three New York Times Ten Best Illustrated Awards, among many other honors.

May 18 2006 | Read Full Review of The Little Red Hen (Phyllis F...

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