The London Train by Tessa Hadley
(P.S.)

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Synopsis

"Hadleyis a lovely, subtly teasing writer." —New York Times Book Review

Long-listed forthe Orange Prize

Twolives, stretched between two cities, converge in a chance meeting withimmediate and far-reaching consequences in this compelling, sophisticated talefrom acclaimed New Yorker writer Tessa Hadley, author of Accidents inthe Home and The Master Bedroom. As father struggles to reestablisha relationship with his estranged daughter in London, surrendering himself toan underground life of illegal squats and counterculture friendships, a wifedecides she must flee her suffocating marriage to return to Wales, where inCardiff she may rediscover the passions that once fueled her life. Embracingchange and facing loss, in a story evocative of Alice Munro’s Runaway andJulia Glass’ I See You Everywhere, Hadley’s powerful charactersilluminate the furthest reaches of love, hope, and determination.

 

About Tessa Hadley

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Tessa Hadley is the author of four highly praised novels: Accidents in the Home, which was longlisted for the Guardian First Book Award; Everything Will Be All Right; The Master Bedroom; and The London Train; and a previous collection of stories, Sunstroke, a New York Times Notable Book of the year. Her stories appear regularly in the New Yorker. She lives in Cardiff and teaches literature and creative writing at Bath Spa University.
 
Published May 24, 2011 by HarperCollins e-books. 340 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Travel. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The London Train

Kirkus Reviews

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Welsh novelist and short-story writer Hadley (Sunstroke, 2007, etc.), combines forms in these two subtle, subtly related stories, one about a man whose life goes into free fall as a father and husband, the second about his barely remembered lover who has let idealized memory dangerously impact he...

May 20 2011 | Read Full Review of The London Train (P.S.)

The New York Times

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Tessa Hadley’s novel is divided between two characters who once intersected for an affair.

May 27 2011 | Read Full Review of The London Train (P.S.)

The Guardian

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The London Train is another Tessa Hadley novel about family relationships, though in this case neither a generational saga (Everything Will Be Alright) nor a tight domestic drama (The Master Bedroom).

Jan 08 2011 | Read Full Review of The London Train (P.S.)

The Guardian

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"She saw herself at that moment as a tiny figure at a great distance, like an illumination in a manuscript: a naked female with little white, forked, vegetable legs, emblematic of the vanity of earthly delights," Hadley writes of Cora as her adventure with Paul spirals out of control.

Dec 31 2010 | Read Full Review of The London Train (P.S.)

The Guardian

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"She saw herself at that moment as a tiny figure at a great distance, like an illumination in a manuscript: a naked female with little white, forked, vegetable legs, emblematic of the vanity of earthly delights," Hadley writes of Cora as her adventure with Paul spirals out of control.

Jan 01 2011 | Read Full Review of The London Train (P.S.)

The Wall Street Journal

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Midway into Stephen Harrigan's expansive novel "Remember Ben Clayton" (Knopf, 353 pages, $26.95), a sculptor named Francis Gilheany, known as Gil, is commissioned by the Louisiana Historical Society to produce a statue of the explorer Robert de La Salle.

May 28 2011 | Read Full Review of The London Train (P.S.)

NPR

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Tessa Hadley creates an intricate tangle of marriage, divorce, lovers and friends in a sophisticated novel that rides the rails between London and Cardiff, Wales.

May 23 2011 | Read Full Review of The London Train (P.S.)

Star Tribune

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Of the two entwined narratives, Cora's story is more engaging, but together you get a full picture of a relationship without balance.

Jun 10 2011 | Read Full Review of The London Train (P.S.)

Book Reporter

In "Only Children," which follows, Cora rides the train when she flees London --- and her husband --- and returns to her birthplace in Cardiff.

Jun 06 2011 | Read Full Review of The London Train (P.S.)

The Independent

Hadley shows, with dizzying aplomb, that the distinction between "literary" fiction and the best domestic fiction is spurious.

Jan 21 2011 | Read Full Review of The London Train (P.S.)

The Telegraph

her protagonists, Paul and Cora, occupying different halves of .

Jan 16 2011 | Read Full Review of The London Train (P.S.)

The Telegraph

This daughter is the child of his first marriage, less vivid than .

Jan 14 2011 | Read Full Review of The London Train (P.S.)

The Bookbag

But, think it would have been far more satisfactory, had Cora's story stood alone - as a novella/short story - as opposed to being compared and contrasted with that of Paul.

Dec 17 2011 | Read Full Review of The London Train (P.S.)

Metro

Book review: In The London Train (Jonathan Cape, £12.99), Tessa Hadley again demonstrates her skill at amplifying the details of lives to reveal their deeper significance.

Jan 05 2011 | Read Full Review of The London Train (P.S.)

Rundpinne

The London Train would make for an excellent choice for book discussion groups and I would recommend it to readers seeking a very well-crafted story about love and life.

Jun 20 2011 | Read Full Review of The London Train (P.S.)

Reader Rating for The London Train
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