The Love Affair as a Work of Art by Dan Hofstadter

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Synopsis

An analysis of recently discovered personal writings by such literary figures as George Sand, Sainte-Beuve, and Alfred de Mussett considers the sexual portions of the writings and how they may have suggested themes for future novels.
 

About Dan Hofstadter

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Dan Hofstadter is the author of The Earth Moves and Falling Palace: A Romance of Naples (a finalist for the PEN/Martha Albrand Award for the Art of the Memoir). He has lived in Florence and Naples and speaks and reads Italian fluently. He lives in Rensselaerville, New York.
 
Published February 1, 1996 by Farrar Straus & Giroux (T). 314 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Health, Fitness & Dieting, History, Political & Social Sciences, Romance, Literature & Fiction, Parenting & Relationships, Self Help. Non-fiction

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Later, after emerging from de Staâl's influence, he would write an extraordinarily misogynist novel, Adolphe--based, ironically enough, on his mentor Madame de Charriäre's Caliste.

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Los Angeles Times

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Perhaps "The Love Affair as a Work of Letters" would be more exact, or "The Love Affair as a Literary Shoving Match" or even--given the enormous volume of correspondence, diaries and memoirs produced--"The Love Affair as a Cure for Writer's Block."

Feb 09 1996 | Read Full Review of The Love Affair as a Work of Art

Boston Review

Steering well clear of the salacious, White Heat gives credence both to the idea that Dickinson purposefully chose Higginson to be her “preceptor,” and that Higginson, the chosen, is a more nuanced figure than previous writers have (often scathingly) suggested—he is ultimately, in Wineapple’s est...

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