The Magic Pocket by Michio Mado
Selected Poems

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Synopsis

Here is a selection of verses by Michio Mado, chosen and translated by the Empress Michiko of Japan. Winner of the 1994 Hans Christian Andersen Author Award, Mado is the much-loved author of poems and songs for children in Japan. The Empress introduced his work to the world outside of Japan in "The Animals: Selected Poems," an earlier book. Her translations, like the originals, are playful and childlike in their imagery. For example: "Fingers Fingers Fingers Fingers, All in a row. No quarrels. Nails Nails Nails, Fingers' faces. Sweet!" The poems are given in the original Japanese, facing their translations in English. For each poem, the internationally known Japanese artist Mitsumasa Anno, winner of the 1984 Hans Christian Andersen Award for Illustration, has made enchanting pictures that catch the full flavor of the verses. A companion to their earlier collaboration, "The Animals," this is a very special book for children of many cultures in the United States.
 

About Michio Mado

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Mitsumasa Anno is the award-winning author-illustrator of , which won the Kate Greenaway Medal Honor award.
 
Published November 1, 1998 by Margaret K. McElderry. 32 pages
Genres: Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Magic Pocket

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A wizard gives young Jack (no doubt kin of the beanstalk Jack) two golden seeds;

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Kirkus Reviews

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Minimal language conjures striking images—“Umbrella, umbrella, The world’s/Biggest flower.” Anno’s neutral-toned illustrations match the diminutive scale of the poems;

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Publishers Weekly

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In ""Let's Play Together,"" for example, the two stanzas repeat, using first an elephant and then a bear: ""Wouldn't it be nice/ If a baby elephant/ Came to my house,/ Saying, `Let's play together.'/ Wouldn't it be nice,/ Mommy?"" Another poem introduces day and night by saying ""Good morning, go...

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