The Malay Archipelago by Alfred Russel Wallace
The Land of the Orang-Utan, and the Bird of Paradise. A Narrative of Travel, with Studies of Man and Nature (Cambridge Library Collection - Life Sciences) (Volume 2)

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He goes, he encounters, observes, contemplates and makes judgments, but somehow places himself off-centre, slightly out of the picture...is an account, not a narrative, and its pleasures are to be taken slowly, but there are delights on every page.
-Guardian

Synopsis

Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913) was a British naturalist who is best remembered as the co-discoverer, with Darwin, of natural selection. His extensive fieldwork and advocacy of the theory of evolution led to him being considered one of the nineteenth century's foremost biologists. These volumes, first published in 1869, contain Wallace's acclaimed and highly influential account of extensive fieldwork he undertook in modern Indonesia, Malaysia and New Guinea between 1854 and 1862. Wallace describes his travels around the island groups, depicting the unusual animals and insects he encountered and providing ethnographic descriptions of the indigenous peoples. Wallace's analysis of biogeographic patterns in Indonesia (later termed the Wallace Line) profoundly influenced contemporary and later evolutionary and geological thought concerning both Indonesia and other areas of the world where similar patterns were found. Volume 2 covers the Molucca Islands and New Guinea.
 

About Alfred Russel Wallace

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Jane R. Camerini is a faculty associate in the department of the History of Science at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.
 
Published October 5, 2010 by Nabu Press. 546 pages
Genres: History, Travel, Science & Math.
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Guardian

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Reviewed by Tim Radford on Jan 11 2013

He goes, he encounters, observes, contemplates and makes judgments, but somehow places himself off-centre, slightly out of the picture...is an account, not a narrative, and its pleasures are to be taken slowly, but there are delights on every page.

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