The March by E.L. Doctorow
A Novel

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Synopsis

WINNER OF THE NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD
WINNER OF THE PEN/FAULKNER AWARD
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

In 1864, Union general William Tecumseh Sherman marched his sixty thousand troops through Georgia to the sea, and then up into the Carolinas. The army fought off Confederate forces, demolished cities, and accumulated a borne-along population of freed blacks and white refugees until all that remained was the dangerous transient life of the dispossessed and the triumphant. In E. L. Doctorow’s hands the great march becomes a floating world, a nomadic consciousness, and an unforgettable reading experience with awesome relevance to our own times.
 

About E.L. Doctorow

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E. L. DOCTOROW was born in 1931 in New York City and was educated at Kenyon College and Columbia University. His earlier novels are Welcome to Hard Times and Big as Life. Formerly editor-in-chief of a prominent New York publishing house, he was most recently writer-in-residence at the University of California at Irvine. He lives in Westchester County with his wife and three children.
 
Published September 20, 2005 by Random House. 384 pages
Genres: History, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The March

The New York Times

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In E. L. Doctorow's telling, Sherman's conquering army moves like a sort of carnivorous worm or slug.

Sep 25 2005 | Read Full Review of The March: A Novel

The Guardian

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The novel speaks to our time, of course, as all good historical novels do, and offers an interesting perspective on the legacy of slavery in particular, as embodied by one character near the end, who tells Virgil Ball rather ominously that the future is made of "passings": "The passing of slavery...

Jan 27 2006 | Read Full Review of The March: A Novel

The Guardian

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is but a war after a war, a war before a war?' Doctorow's masterly novel resurrects a bloody conflict whose causes are not necessarily buried in the past.

Feb 11 2006 | Read Full Review of The March: A Novel

NPR

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Alan Cheuse reviews E. L. Doctorow's latest novel, The March. It chronicles Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's devastating march through Georgia and the Carolinas during the Civil War.

Oct 18 2005 | Read Full Review of The March: A Novel

NPR

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For years, E.L. Doctorow thought that Union Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's destructive march to the sea near the end of the Civil War would make for a gripping work of fiction.

Oct 18 2005 | Read Full Review of The March: A Novel

Book Reporter

chance, on the wrong side of the war --- his war.

Jan 07 2011 | Read Full Review of The March: A Novel

AV Club

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Doctorow expertly contrasts the detached military decorum of the West Point-trained generals on both sides with the ever-shifting hopes of the civilians and soldiers who join the march, praying for safety and a head start on a prosperous post-war life.

Oct 12 2005 | Read Full Review of The March: A Novel

Entertainment Weekly

The March (2005) In his career-long effort to map the genome of this mongrel nation, E.L.

Sep 21 2005 | Read Full Review of The March: A Novel

USA Today

This turbulent period of social upheaval in American history gives Doctorow an opportunity to explore the most painful questions in American history: slavery, racism, the forbidden topic of children born to slave mothers and white owners, freedom, courage, the blood thrill of war, the collapse of...

Sep 19 2005 | Read Full Review of The March: A Novel

Bookmarks Magazine

Michiko Kakutani Critical Summary Critics call The March an unequaled success, reminiscent of Doctorow’s classic Ragtime in spirit and The Red Badge of Courage, War and Peace, and Gone With the Wind in grand scope and "churn and boil of a plot" (Rocky Mountain News).

Oct 15 2007 | Read Full Review of The March: A Novel

ReadySteadyBook

It would seem that every good rule of literature worked against this novel: it’s characters seldom get fleshed out - they tend to stand more as abstractions and ideas about war and race, as symbols - Doctorow’s uses an all-too-familiar Civil War backdrop which prompts the reader to be prepared fo...

Sep 13 2005 | Read Full Review of The March: A Novel

Reader Rating for The March
69%

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