The Marquess of Queensberry by Linda Stratmann
Wilde's Nemesis

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Stratmann has worked hard to trace obscure newspaper and archival sources, both of which she has used well. It is pleasing to find a biographer who digs so deep to unearth extenuating circumstances for her subject.
-Guardian

Synopsis

The Marquess of Queensberry is as famous for his role in the downfall of one of our greatest literary geniuses as he was for helping establish the rules for modern-day boxing. The trial and two-year imprisonment of Oscar Wilde, lover of Queensberry’s son, Lord Alfred Douglas, remains one of literary history’s great tragedies. However, Linda Stratmann's riveting biography of the Marquess paints a far more complex picture by drawing on new sources and unpublished letters. Throughout his life, Queensberry was emotionally damaged by a series of tragedies, and the events of the Wilde affair—told for the first time from the Marquess’s perspective—were directly linked to Queensberry’s personal crises. Through the retelling of pivotal events from Queensberry’s life—the death of his brother on the Matterhorn and his fruitless search for the body; the suicides of his father, brother, and eldest son—the book reveals a well-meaning man often stricken with a grief he found hard to express, who deserves our compassion.
 

About Linda Stratmann

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Linda Stratmann is the author of Chloroform: The Quest for Oblivion and The Poisonous Seed.
 
Published April 15, 2013 by Yale University Press. 351 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Travel.
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Critic reviews for The Marquess of Queensberry
All: 3 | Positive: 3 | Negative: 0

Kirkus

Good
on Apr 16 2013

While formal and academic, this portrait presents compelling new evidence of Queensberry’s humanity.

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Guardian

Good
Reviewed by Richard Davenport-Hines on Apr 17 2013

Stratmann has worked hard to trace obscure newspaper and archival sources, both of which she has used well. It is pleasing to find a biographer who digs so deep to unearth extenuating circumstances for her subject.

Read Full Review of The Marquess of Queensberry: ... | See more reviews from Guardian

WSJ online

Good
Reviewed by D.J. TAYLOR on Jul 12 2013

Ms. Stratmann does her best...files plausible explanations for nearly every one of the scrapes he was involved in, plays up his spiritual interests and offers liberal quotations from the quasi-devotional poem inspired by his alpine trauma.

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