The Maytrees by Annie Dillard

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 8 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

Toby Maytree first sees Lou Bigelow on her bicycle in postwar Provincetown, Massachusetts. Her laughter and loveliness catch his breath. Maytree is a Provincetown native, an educated poet of thirty. As he courts Lou, just out of college, her stillness draws him. Hands-off, he hides his serious wooing, and idly shows her his poems.

In spare, elegant prose, Dillard traces the Maytrees' decades of loving and longing. They live cheaply among the nonconformist artists and writers that the bare tip of Cape Cod attracts. When their son Petie appears, their innocent Bohemian friend Deary helps care for him. But years later it is Deary who causes the town to talk.

In this moving novel, Dillard intimately depicts willed bonds of loyalty, friendship, and abiding love. She presents nature's vastness and nearness. Warm and hopeful, The Maytrees is the surprising capstone of Dillard's original body of work.

 

About Annie Dillard

See more books from this Author
Annie Dillard has written eleven books, including the memoir of her parents, An American Childhood; the Northwest pioneer epic The Living; and the nonfiction narrative Pilgrim at Tinker Creek. A gregarious recluse, she is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters.
 
Published October 13, 2009 by HarperCollins e-books. 244 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Cooking. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Maytrees

The New York Times

See more reviews from this publication

Annie Dillard’s novel charts the course of a long and occasionally happy marriage.

Jul 29 2007 | Read Full Review of The Maytrees

The New York Times

See more reviews from this publication

Annie Dillard’s novel charts the course of a long and occasionally happy marriage.

Jul 29 2007 | Read Full Review of The Maytrees

The Guardian

See more reviews from this publication

Instead of walling themselves off from the horrors of old age and death with bricks, electric light and television -"the low-ceilinged cave most Americans lived in unknowingly" - the Maytrees are attempting to live unarmoured, "nothing about them ...

Dec 07 2007 | Read Full Review of The Maytrees

The Guardian

See more reviews from this publication

Toby's staunch determination to die with dignity, and his rueful realisation that his new-found theory on beauty 'required - like most, he suspected - more thought' makes a profound case against complacency.

Nov 15 2008 | Read Full Review of The Maytrees

Book Reporter

Instead, Toby muses, he simply “fell in love,.

Jan 07 2011 | Read Full Review of The Maytrees

Open Letters Monthly

Paragraphs like these, almost all of which come at the tail end of a slow book, give us a maddening taste of what Annie Dillard could do if she wrote a whole novel this way—passing over what characters don’t say in a way that renders silence meaningful, rather than frustrating for the reader, and...

| Read Full Review of The Maytrees

Bookmarks Magazine

Margot Livesey "Dillard’s lush, perfect prose paints a winning portrait of these artistic, opinionated, strong-willed characters who love books, love words, embrace life.

Aug 07 2007 | Read Full Review of The Maytrees

AARP

And the plot's time and place are rendered so vividly the reader feels she could be clamming right alongside Lou, Toby, and their artist friends, with Cape Cod's dunes in the distance—"just that stretch of sand the coastwise current picked up from crumbling cliffs to the south and dropped here in...

Jul 14 2009 | Read Full Review of The Maytrees

Reader Rating for The Maytrees
63%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 147 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×