The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare
The Graphic Novel (Campfire Graphic Novels)

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 12 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

A gamble on trading ships at sea, a pound of flesh as the penalty, a contest to win the hand of a rich heiress, and the final rescue in a court of law--The Merchant of Venice has all the ingredients required which make it one of Shakespeare's most dramatic romantic comedies.

Antonio is the merchant of Venice who borrows money to help his friend Bassanio win Portia in marriage. He borrows the money from Shylock, a shrewd moneylender who devises a retribution unprecedented in the annals of law...

...till a young lawyer defeats him in his own game. Who is this young lawyer? What is the clinching argument? The Merchant of Venice is memorable as much for its dramatic scenes as for its strong characters, all of which remain etched in the mind long after the story has been read.
 

About William Shakespeare

See more books from this Author
William Shakespeare was born on April 26, 1564 in Warwickshire, England. The theme of Shakespeare's work tended to be human feelings such as fear, ambition, and jealousy. His most well known works such as Othello, King Lear, and Macbeth thrived on the weaknesses of human emotions. In Romeo and Juliet he would play on the eternally popular theme of the doomed lovers whose parents object to their union. Although he died in 1616, Shakespeare's enduring popularity shows no sign of weakening. His work is constantly performed with a plethora of yearly stage plays, and the numerous television adaptations and popular Hollywood films released over the years.
 
Published May 24, 2011 by Campfire. 80 pages
Genres: Comics & Graphic Novels, Literature & Fiction, Children's Books. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Merchant of Venice

The Guardian

See more reviews from this publication

It may seem a gimmick to have Launcelot Gobbo played by Jamie Beamish as an Elvis impersonator, but it yields a handsome return when Portia's climactic breakdown is accompanied by the strains of Are You Lonesome Tonight.

May 20 2011 | Read Full Review of The Merchant of Venice: The G...

The Guardian

See more reviews from this publication

So really, it pulls on the purse strings and to somebody that has more self-respect than to be a capitalist it makes them feel rather sick that all this pain, false actions of affection and putting aside the racism for five minutes just to get what is wanted come from the desire for money and gold.

Mar 04 2011 | Read Full Review of The Merchant of Venice: The G...

The Telegraph

Indeed poor Patrick Stewart seems to inhabit an entirely different production from the rest of the cast, giving us a sombre and increasingly frail Jew which is intermittently impressive in its own right but seems to have little to do with the gaudy excesses of the rest of the show.

May 20 2011 | Read Full Review of The Merchant of Venice: The G...

Dallas News

FORT WORTH —The Merchant of Venicemight be Shakespeare’s most sharply divided play.

Jun 22 2012 | Read Full Review of The Merchant of Venice: The G...

Chicago Tribune

Compared with the broad stereotypical princes of Morocco and Arragon who precede him in choosing among the caskets of gold, silver and lead for Portia's hand, Bassanio is a catch, particularly since "the will of the living daughter is curbed by the will of a dead father" and Portia can't choose h...

Jul 16 2012 | Read Full Review of The Merchant of Venice: The G...

London Review of Books

What neither the cinema nor the stage explains is why the play is so shadowed by unease and unhappiness, even though all seems to go right: the villain is punished and the dissolute boy gets the rich girl and they all meet again at Belmont – such a blissful place, especially in the movie – only t...

| Read Full Review of The Merchant of Venice: The G...

Mail Online

Moneylender Shylock has become a gaming tycoon and we meet him initially while he is playing office golf under CCTV screens of his roulette wheels.

May 19 2011 | Read Full Review of The Merchant of Venice: The G...

The New Yorker

But Pacino’s Shylock, it turns out, is interesting not in relation to the rest of the play but because he is Pacino’s Shylock.

Jul 12 2010 | Read Full Review of The Merchant of Venice: The G...

Project MUSE

Edward Hall's 2009 production of The Merchant of Venice, staged in London and Brooklyn by the all-male Propeller Company, contracted the international economy of Shakespeare's Venice into the grungy, brutal, and unruly underground of a mid-century men's prison.

| Read Full Review of The Merchant of Venice: The G...

The Jewish Chronicle

There is a crystal clarity to Ronen’s production, and not just because Venice’s Jews dress in reddish ochre and the Christians in pure white, but because the quality of Habima’s performances is so high and the show’s central motif — ropes that bind Antonio and Shylock to the centre of both the pl...

May 31 2012 | Read Full Review of The Merchant of Venice: The G...

Washingtonian

And is the Merchant of Venice an anti-Semitic play, or a rebuke against anti-Semitism?

Jun 27 2011 | Read Full Review of The Merchant of Venice: The G...

Graphic Novel Reporter

For instance, the play opens with Antonio saying, “In sooth I know not why I am so sad./ It wearies me, you say it wearies you./ But how I caught it, found it, or came by it,/ What stuff ’tis made of, whereof it is born,/ I am to learn.” The graphic novel opens with Antonio saying.

| Read Full Review of The Merchant of Venice: The G...

Rate this book!

Add Review