The Mezzanine by Nicholson Baker

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The minutiae of daily life are brilliantly explored in Nicholson Baker's humorous account of one man's lunch hour.
-Guardian

Synopsis

In his startling, witty, and inexhaustibly inventive first novel—first published in 1986 and now reissued as a Grove Press paperback—the author of Vox and The Fermata uses a one-story escalator ride as the occasion for a dazzling reappraisal of everyday objects and rituals. From the humble milk carton to the act of tying one’s shoes, The Mezzanine at once defamiliarizes the familiar world and endows it with loopy and euphoric poetry. Nicholson Baker’s accounts of the ordinary become extraordinary through his sharp storytelling and his unconventional, conversational style. At first glance, The Mezzanine appears to be a book about nothing. In reality, it is a brilliant celebration of things, simultaneously demonstrating the value of reflection and the importance of everyday human human experiences.
 

About Nicholson Baker

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Nicholson Baker lives in Maine.
 
Published July 13, 2010 by Grove Press. 142 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Critic reviews for The Mezzanine
All: 2 | Positive: 2 | Negative: 0

Guardian

Excellent
Reviewed by Ben East on Jul 23 2011

The minutiae of daily life are brilliantly explored in Nicholson Baker's humorous account of one man's lunch hour.

Read Full Review of The Mezzanine | See more reviews from Guardian

NPR

Good
Reviewed by Antoine Wilson on Oct 12 2013

Is it a trifle, a gag, a stunt? Yes, yes and yes. And yet, Nicholson Baker's The Mezzanine is as enjoyable, brilliant, and, ahem, Proustian as anything you'll read this year.

Read Full Review of The Mezzanine | See more reviews from NPR

Reader Rating for The Mezzanine
70%

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