The Mind at Work by Mike Rose
Valuing the Intelligence of the American Worker

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Synopsis

Featuring a new preface for the 10th anniversary

As did the national bestseller Nickel and Dimed, Mike Rose’s revelatory book demolishes the long-held notion that people who work with their hands make up a less intelligent class. He shows us waitresses making lightning-fast calculations, carpenters handling complex spatial mathematics, and hairdressers, plumbers, and electricians with their aesthetic and diagnostic acumen. Rose, an educator who is himself the son of a waitress, explores the intellectual repertory of everyday workers and the terrible social cost of undervaluing the work they do. Deftly combining research, interviews, and personal history, this is one of those rare books that has the capacity both to shape public policy and to illuminate general readers.


 

About Mike Rose

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Mike Rose, a professor at the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, is the author of many books, including Lives on the Boundary, The Mind at Work, and Possible Lives. Among his awards are a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Grawemeyer Award in Education, and the Commonwealth Club of California Award for Literary Excellence in Nonfiction. He lives in Santa Monica.
 
Published July 26, 2005 by Penguin Books. 304 pages
Genres: Business & Economics, Health, Fitness & Dieting, Political & Social Sciences, Science & Math, Professional & Technical. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Mind at Work

Publishers Weekly

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Rose (Possible Lives ) finds conventional assessment of intelligence tied to social class: to IQ tests that measure formal schooling rather than capacity, and judgments that elevate "mind work" such as teaching or surgery over so-called "body work" represented by hair stylists or plumbers.

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Bookmarks Magazine

In the tradition of Barbara Ehrenreich’s Nickel and Dimed and Studs Terkel’s Working, The Mind at Work is an illuminating reassessment of American labor.

Oct 08 2007 | Read Full Review of The Mind at Work: Valuing the...

truthdig

“[U[ltimately, growing class segregation across neighborhoods, schools, marriages (and probably also civic associations, workplaces and friendship circles) means that rich Americans and poor Americans are living, learning, and raising children in increasingly separate and unequal worlds, removing...

Mar 04 2016 | Read Full Review of The Mind at Work: Valuing the...

truthdig

“Comparing Port Clinton kids in the 1950’s with Port Clinton kids today,” Putnam writes, “the opportunity gap has widened dramatically, partly because affluent kids now enjoy more advantages than affluent kids then, but mostly because poor kids now are in much worse shape than their counterparts ...

Mar 04 2016 | Read Full Review of The Mind at Work: Valuing the...

truthdig

This week on Truthdig Radio in association with KPFK: The former congressman says, “You can’t just stay silent when you see a massacre of people going on.” Also: Washington, D.C., will decide whether to legalize marijuana.

Oct 01 2014 | Read Full Review of The Mind at Work: Valuing the...

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In North Dakota, however, all that public revenue runs through its public state bank, which in turn reinvests in the state’s small businesses and public infrastructure via partnerships with 80 small community banks.

Mar 30 2013 | Read Full Review of The Mind at Work: Valuing the...

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By bogi666, June 19, 2009 at 3:13 am Link to this comment(Unregistered commenter).

Jun 18 2009 | Read Full Review of The Mind at Work: Valuing the...

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McCain is no maverick,(which actually means an independent politician), but he is a war hawk with allegiance to the military industrial complex.

Sep 08 2008 | Read Full Review of The Mind at Work: Valuing the...

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