The Mirage of Global Markets by David Arnold
How Globalizing Companies Can Succeed as Markets Localize

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Synopsis

Why do even the best companies struggle to become as profitable in international markets as they are at home? Because they've fallen for the "mirage" of a truly global market. In fact, the world is comprised of hundreds of intensely local markets that are becoming more fragmented with each passing year. In The Mirage of Global Markets, David Arnold reveals why multinationals are actually losing market share--and how the world is rapidly accelerating towards "segments of one." Next, he offers you a comprehensive new blueprint for maximizing profitability in a world of local markets. You will discover why international marketing has become radically different from conventional marketing, and you will learn how to cost-effectively localize all the decisions that matter most: decisions about market entry, product mix, distribution, promotion, communication, strategy and more. Simply put, The Mirage of Global Markets shows how to globally manage the intensely local marketing programs that are now utterly crucial to your success.

 

About David Arnold

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David Arnold was Assistant Professor of Business Administration at the Harvard Business School and head of its International Marketing Management course. Now an independent consultant and educator, he specializes in international marketing, branding, market analysis, and strategy formulation. His innovative recent work has appeared in Harvard Business Review, Journal of International Business Studies, Sloan Management Review, California Management Review, and the Marketing Science Institute working paper series. He has served as visiting or resident faculty member at leading business schools in Great Britain, Japan, Switzerland, Spain, Argentina, Finland, India, and Pakistan. Arnold's previous book, The Handbook of Brand Management, has been published in 10 languages.
 
Published July 31, 2003 by FT Press. 256 pages
Genres: Business & Economics, Political & Social Sciences. Non-fiction

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