The Mother of All Questions by Rebecca Solnit
Further Reports from the Feminist Revolutions

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Candid as ever, to a biting and witty degree that lends a comforting familiarity, Solnit admits that she herself has never wanted children because she desires solitude in life and the room to invest the majority of her time into her work.
-National Post arts

Synopsis

In a timely follow-up to her national bestseller Men Explain Things to Me, Rebecca Solnit offers indispensable commentary on women who refuse to be silenced, misogynistic violence, the fragile masculinity of the literary canon, the gender binary, the recent history of rape jokes, and much more.

In characteristic style, Solnit mixes humor, keen analysis, and powerful insight in these essays.
 

About Rebecca Solnit

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Rebecca Solnit is the author of ten books. In 2003, she received the prestigious Lannan Literary Award.
 
Published February 12, 2017 by Haymarket Books. 192 pages
Genres: Political & Social Sciences, Humor & Entertainment. Non-fiction
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Critic reviews for The Mother of All Questions
All: 2 | Positive: 2 | Negative: 0

Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Michelle Dean on Nov 11 2017

Stories such as these don’t feel like victories. Instead, they shut you up in a room with your own uncomfortable memories, the things you’ve kept silent about. Solnit could not have planned it this way but the longest and only previously unpublished essay in this well-timed book happens to be concerned with the notion of silencing.

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National Post arts

Above average
Reviewed by Sadaf Ahsan on Mar 24 2017

Candid as ever, to a biting and witty degree that lends a comforting familiarity, Solnit admits that she herself has never wanted children because she desires solitude in life and the room to invest the majority of her time into her work.

Read Full Review of The Mother of All Questions: ... | See more reviews from National Post arts
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