The Motion of Puppets by Keith Donohue
A Novel

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...doesn’t bother to explain supernatural events. How they occur is one of those mysteries best left to the reader’s imagination. Either you are willing to believe or you needn’t bother reading. And that would be a shame. Donohue has a gift for drawing vibrant characters.
-Blog Critics

Synopsis

From the author of The Boy Who Drew Monsters and The Stolen Child comes a modern take on the Orpheus and Eurydice Myth―A Suspenseful tale of romance and enchantment

In the Old City of Québec, Kay Harper falls in love with a puppet in the window of the Quatre Mains, a toy shop that is never open. She is spending her summer working as an acrobat with the cirque while her husband, Theo, is translating a biography of the pioneering photographer Eadweard Muybridge. Late one night, Kay fears someone is following her home. Surprised to see that the lights of the toy shop are on and the door is open, she takes shelter inside.

The next morning Theo wakes up to discover his wife is missing. Under police suspicion and frantic at her disappearance, he obsessively searches the streets of the Old City. Meanwhile, Kay has been transformed into a puppet, and is now a prisoner of the back room of the Quatre Mains, trapped with an odd assemblage of puppets from all over the world who can only come alive between the hours of midnight and dawn. The only way she can return to the human world is if Theo can find her and recognize her in her new form. So begins the dual odyssey of Keith Donohue's The Motion of Puppets: of a husband determined to find his wife, and of a woman trapped in a magical world where her life is not her own.

 

About Keith Donohue

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Keith Donohue is the Director of Communications for the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, the grant-making arm of the National Archives in Washington, DC. Until 1998 he worked at the National Endowment for the Arts and wrote hundreds of speeches for chairmen John Frohnmayer and Jane Alexander. He has written articles for The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and other newspapers. Donohue holds a Ph.D. in English from The Catholic University of America. His dissertation on Irish writer Flann O'Brien was published as The Irish Anatomist: A Study of Flann O'Brien (Maunsel Press, 2003).
 
Published October 4, 2016 by Picador. 272 pages
Genres: Horror, Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Critic reviews for The Motion of Puppets
All: 1 | Positive: 1 | Negative: 0

Blog Critics

Above average
Reviewed by Jack Goodstein on Sep 15 2016

...doesn’t bother to explain supernatural events. How they occur is one of those mysteries best left to the reader’s imagination. Either you are willing to believe or you needn’t bother reading. And that would be a shame. Donohue has a gift for drawing vibrant characters.

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