The Natural Order of Things by António Lobo Antunes

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Synopsis

A novel the Los Angeles Times Book Review called "a work of poetic and erotic genius from a master navigator of the human psyche", The Natural Order of Things is a tale of two families and the secrets that bind them. The voices of his characters -- an army officer being tortured in prison on charges of conspiracy; an elderly man, once a miner in Mozambique, now reduced to dreams of "flying underground"; a diabetic teenage girl and the middle-aged husband she despises; the officer's illegitimate sister, locked away to haunt the house like Bertha Rochester in Jane Eyre -- create a portrait of a disintegrating Portugal, a personal political history that attains the brilliance and surreality of Elias Canetti and Nikolai Gogol.
 

About António Lobo Antunes

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Lobo Antunes, a psychiatrist and a soldier in the Portuguese colonial wars in Angola, was born in Lisbon. "South of Nowhere", his second novel, published in 1980, became the center of controversy both because of its daring content and its novel structure. The action is very brief: it lasts only one night. The author tells a silent woman companion his frank impressions about his experience as a medical doctor in the war of liberation against Portuguese colonialism. In some passages, the novel makes allusion to The Lusiads and its allegorical intentions. It denounces with lucid sarcasm the failure of Portuguese colonization in Africa. Richard Zenith is a renowned translator from the Portuguese. His translations include works by Antonio Lobo Antunes and Fernando Pessoa. He is the author of a short story collection (Terceires Pessoas). He has received grants from the NEA and the Guggenheim. He lives in Lisbon.
 
Published February 1, 2000 by Grove Pr. 298 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Law & Philosophy. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Natural Order of Things

Publishers Weekly

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Using the poetic resources of language, and hinging his plot less on everyday logic than on a dreamlike progression from character to metaphor to history, Antunes's fantastically complex and compresse

Jan 31 2000 | Read Full Review of The Natural Order of Things

Publishers Weekly

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Using the poetic resources of language, and hinging his plot less on everyday logic than on a dreamlike progression from character to metaphor to history, Antunes's fantastically complex and compresse

Jan 31 2000 | Read Full Review of The Natural Order of Things

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