The New Urban Crisis by Richard Florida
How Our Cities Are Increasing Inequality, Deepening Segregation, and Failing the Middle Class—and What We Can Do About It

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 5 Critic Reviews

Florida repeats many old myths, for instance suggesting that New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Boston – although all being highly segregated and unequal – offer greater avenues for upward mobility for the poor. They don’t.
-Guardian

Synopsis


In recent years, the young, educated, and affluent have surged back into cities, reversing decades of suburban flight and urban decline. And yet all is not well, Richard Florida argues in The New Urban Crisis. Florida, one of the first scholars to anticipate this back-to-the-city movement in his groundbreaking The Rise of the Creative Class, demonstrates how the same forces that power the growth of the world's superstar cities also generate their vexing challenges: gentrification, unaffordability, segregation, and inequality. Meanwhile, many more cities still stagnate, and middle-class neighborhoods everywhere are disappearing. Our winner-take-all cities are just one manifestation of a profound crisis in today's urbanized knowledge economy.

A bracingly original work of research and analysis, The New Urban Crisis offers a compelling diagnosis of our economic ills and a bold prescription for more inclusive cities capable of ensuring growth and prosperity for all.

 

About Richard Florida

See more books from this Author
Author of the bestselling The Rise of the Creative Class and Who's Your City?, Richard Florida is a regular columnist for The Atlantic. He has written for the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, The Economist, and other publications. His multiple awards and accolades include the Harvard Business Review's Breakthrough Idea of the Year. He was named one of Esquire magazine's Best and Brightest (2005) and one of BusinessWeek's Voices of Innovation (2006). He lives in Toronto, Canada.
 
Published April 11, 2017 by Basic Books. 276 pages
Genres: Political & Social Sciences. Non-fiction
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for The New Urban Crisis
All: 5 | Positive: 1 | Negative: 4

Kirkus

Above average
on Feb 06 2017

Throughout, the author remains an idealistic, perceptive observer of cities’ transformations. A sobering account of inequality and spatial conflict rising against a cultural backdrop of urban change.

Read Full Review of The New Urban Crisis: How Our... | See more reviews from Kirkus

NY Journal of Books

Above average
Reviewed by Marilyn Gates on May 20 2017

Despite this mismatch of a blueprint for democratizing the city and today’s Republican reality, The New Urban Crisis is well worth reading for the original research, clear-headed critique and the skilled analysis of solid data.

Read Full Review of The New Urban Crisis: How Our... | See more reviews from NY Journal of Books

NY Times

Below average
Reviewed by Nicole gelinas on Jun 26 2017

“The New Urban Crisis” would have benefited from a chapter examining one city, to demonstrate that numbers aren’t everything...Several of Florida’s solutions are sound — although they, too, would benefit from a closer look at individual cities.

Read Full Review of The New Urban Crisis: How Our... | See more reviews from NY Times

Globe and Mail

Below average
Reviewed by Marcus Gee on Apr 07 2017

In 310 pages of learned hand-wringing, he describes a "new age of winner-take-all urbanism, in which the talented and the advantaged cluster and colonize a small, select group of superstar cities, leaving everybody and everywhere else behind."

Read Full Review of The New Urban Crisis: How Our... | See more reviews from Globe and Mail

Guardian

Below average
Reviewed by Danny Dorling on Sep 26 2017

Florida repeats many old myths, for instance suggesting that New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Boston – although all being highly segregated and unequal – offer greater avenues for upward mobility for the poor. They don’t.

Read Full Review of The New Urban Crisis: How Our... | See more reviews from Guardian
×