The North by Paul Morley
(And Almost Everything In It)

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Morley says that "the beauty of the North is that it is all about difference and a refusal to sacrifice a pungent hard-won sense of difference". That hard-won sense permeates every page of this leviathan, along with flair, gloom, graft and sundry other very northern qualities.
-Guardian

Synopsis

Here is the north, this is where it lies, where it belongs, full of itself, high up above everything else, surrounded by everything that isn't the north, that's off the page, somewhere else...

Paul Morley grew up in Reddish, less than five miles from Manchester and even closer to Stockport. Ever since the age of seven, old enough to form an identity but too young to be aware that 'southern' was a category, Morley has always thought of himself as a northerner. What that meant, he wasn't entirely sure. It was for him, as it is for millions of others in England, an absolute, indisputable truth. But he wondered why, when as a child he was so ready to abandon his Cheshire roots and support the much more successful Lancashire cricket team, and when as an adult he found he could travel between London and Manchester in less than two hours, he continued to say he was from the North.

Forty years after walking down grey pavements on his way to school, Paul explores what it means to be northern and why those who consider themselves to be believe it so strongly. Like industrial towns dotted across great green landscapes of hills and valleys, Morley breaks up his own history with fragments of his region's own social and cultural background. Stories of his Dad spreading margarine on Weetabix stand alongside those about northern England's first fish and chip shop in Mossley, near Oldham. And out of these lyrical memories rise many disconnected voices of the north; Wordsworth's poetry, Larkin's reflections and Formby's guitar. Morley maps the entire history of northern England through its people and the places they call home - from the frozen landscapes of the Ice Age to the Norman invasion to the construction of the Blackpool tower - to show that the differences go deeper than just an accent.

Ambitiously sweeping and beautifully impressionistic, without ever losing touch with the minute details of life above the M25, The North is an extraordinary mixture of memoir and history, a unique insight into how we, as a nation, classify the unclassifiable.

 

About Paul Morley

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Paul Morley grew up in Stockport, Cheshire, and has worked as a music journalist, pop svengali and broadcaster. He is the author of a number of books on music – Ask: The Chatter of Pop, Words and Music: A History of Pop in the Shape of a City, Joy Division: Piece by Piece and Joy Division: Fragments – as well as an acclaimed memoir of his early years, Nothing. Paul has written for a number of publications, including the New Statesman, the Sunday Telegraph, NME, the Observer and the Guardian.
 
Published September 5, 2013 by Bloomsbury Academic. 592 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Education & Reference, Travel.
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Critic reviews for The North
All: 3 | Positive: 1 | Negative: 2

Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Stuart Maconie on Jul 13 2014

Morley says that "the beauty of the North is that it is all about difference and a refusal to sacrifice a pungent hard-won sense of difference". That hard-won sense permeates every page of this leviathan, along with flair, gloom, graft and sundry other very northern qualities.

Read Full Review of The North: (And Almost Everyt... | See more reviews from Guardian

Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Terry Eagleton on Jun 13 2013

This grab-bag of a book mixes poetry and sociology, history and autobiography. Yet if some of it suffers from a rather slipshod lyricism, the auto-biographical sections are too flatly naturalistic.

Read Full Review of The North: (And Almost Everyt... | See more reviews from Guardian

Financial Times

Above average
Reviewed by Andrew Martin on Jun 07 2013

In the Acknowledgements, people are thanked for shaping and editing the book. My instinct would have been to do more of that...

Read Full Review of The North: (And Almost Everyt... | See more reviews from Financial Times

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