The Old Woman Who Named Things by Cynthia Rylant

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Synopsis

How does an old woman who has outlived all her friends keep from being lonely? By naming the things in her life she knows she will never outlive--like her house, Franklin, and her bed, Roxanne. When a shy brown puppy appears at her front gate, the old woman won’t name it, because it might not outlive her. Tender watercolors capture the charm of this heartwarming story of an old woman who doesn’t know she’s lonely until she meets a plucky puppy who needs a name--and someone to love. “Rylant and Brown together create with affection and lovingly humorous touches a glimpse of old age lived with relish.”--Booklist
 

About Cynthia Rylant

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Cynthia Rylant was born on June 6, 1954 in Hopewell, Virginia. She attended and received degrees at Morris Harvey College, Marshall University, and Kent State University. Rylant worked as an English professor and at the children's department of a public library, where she first discovered her love of children's literature. She has written more than 100 children's books in English and Spanish, including works of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Her novel Missing May won the 1993 Newbery Medal and A Fine White Dust was a 1987 Newbery Honor book. Rylant wrote A Kindness, Soda Jerk, and A Couple of Kooks and Other Stories, which were named as Best Book for Young Adults. When I was Young in the Mountains and The Relatives Came won the Caldecott Award. She has many popular picture books series, including Henry and Mudge, Mr. Putter and Tabby and High-Rise Private Eyes. Kathryn Brown lives in western Massachusetts.
 
Published August 1, 2000 by Perfection Learning. 32 pages
Genres: Children's Books, Literature & Fiction, Nature & Wildlife. Fiction

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Kirkus Reviews

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She doesn't like being all alone without anyone to call by name, so she names things, but only the ones she can't outlive: Her bed is Roxanne, her house is Franklin, her chair is Fred, and her car is Betsy.

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Publishers Weekly

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after losing many friends ""she named only those things she knew she could never outlive."" When the dog disappears, however, she realizes that finding him-and subsequently naming him-is worth the risk of outliving him.

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