The Other Side by Jacqueline Woodson

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Synopsis

Clover's mom says it isn't safe to cross the fence that segregates their African-American side of town from the white side where Anna lives. But the two girls strike up a friendship, and get around the grown-ups' rules by sitting on top of the fence together.

With the addition of a brand-new author's note, this special edition celebrates the tenth anniversary of this classic book. As always, Woodson moves readers with her lyrical narrative, and E. B. Lewis's amazing talent shines in his gorgeous watercolor illustrations.
 

About Jacqueline Woodson

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Jacqueline Woodson (www.jacquelinewoodson.com) is a three time Newbery Honor Award winner. Her other picture book with E. B. Lewis, Coming On Home Soon, was a Caldecott Honor Book. Her picture book with Hudson Talbott, Show Way, was a Newbery Honor Book, as were her novels Feathers and After Tupac and D Foster. Other novels include Coretta Scott King Award Winner Miracle's Boys and National Book Award nominee Locomotion. She lives with her family in Brooklyn, New York.E. B. Lewis (www.eblewis.com), the celebrated illustrator of many beautiful picture books, has received a Caldecott Honor, Coretta Scott King Award, and Coretta Scott King Honor. He lives in Folsom, New Jersey.
 
Published January 15, 2001 by G.P. Putnam's Sons Books for Young Readers. 32 pages
Genres: Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Other Side

Kirkus Reviews

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Race relations, a complex issue, is addressed in a simple manner through the eyes of two young girls, one black and one white, on either side of a fence that divides their yards and, in fact, the town.

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Publishers Weekly

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Woodson (If You Come Softly; I Hadn't Meant to Tell You This) lays out her resonant story like a poem, its central metaphor a fence that divides blacks from whites. Lewis's (My Rows and Piles of Coins

Jan 15 2001 | Read Full Review of The Other Side

Publishers Weekly

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By season's end, they join Clover's other pals jumping rope and, when they stop to rest, ""We sat up on the fence, all of us in a long line."" Lewis depicts bygone days with the girls in dresses and white sneakers and socks, and Woodson hints at a bright future with her closing lines: ""Someday s...

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KidsReads

Clover doesn't understand why there's a fence that separates the black side of town and the white side.

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Reader Rating for The Other Side
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