The Other Wind by Ursula K. Le Guin
(The Earthsea Cycle, Book 6)

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Synopsis

The sorcerer Alder fears sleep. He dreams of the land of death, of his wife who died young and longs to return to him so much that she kissed him across the low stone wall that separates our world from the Dry Land-where the grass is withered, the stars never move, and lovers pass without knowing each other. The dead are pulling Alder to them at night. Through him they may free themselves and invade Earthsea.

Alder seeks advice from Ged, once Archmage. Ged tells him to go to Tenar, Tehanu, and the young king at Havnor. They are joined by amber-eyed Irian, a fierce dragon able to assume the shape of a woman.

The threat can be confronted only in the Immanent Grove on Roke, the holiest place in the world and there the king, hero, sage, wizard, and dragon make a last stand.

Le Guin combines her magical fantasy with a profoundly human, earthly, humble touch.

 

About Ursula K. Le Guin

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Ursula K. Le Guin was born in Berkeley, California, in 1929. Among her honors are a National Book Award, five Hugo and five Nebula Awards, the Kafka Award, a Pushcart Prize, and the Harold D. Vursell Memorial Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She lives in Portland, Oregon. www.ursulakleguin.com
 
Published September 13, 2001 by Mariner Books. 285 pages
Genres: Science Fiction & Fantasy, Literature & Fiction, Nature & Wildlife, Children's Books, Horror. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Other Wind

Kirkus Reviews

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some quietly describe country walks, Celtic ruins--or moments of self-reflection: "At a quarter to fifth the clock struck/ Lost, lost in a sweet voice,/ Lost so many times/ that I lost count, and so believed,/ and came to live in the house of grief."

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Kirkus Reviews

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Back among the wizards and dragons of Earthsea (Tales from Earthsea;

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The Guardian

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But Le Guin has worked out why women can't do proper spells, why her version of death is so nightmarish, and, indeed, why there is magic at all - and what it does to the world, for all the fancy talk of balance that the authorities draw on.

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Publishers Weekly

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and sometimes reflective, as in the title story, a parable/fairy tale about love and political change in a place where ""[t]hey stood on the stones in the lightly falling snow and listened to the silvery, trembling sound of thousands of keys being shaken, unlocking the air, once upon a time.'' Ad...

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Publishers Weekly

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In "The Birthday of the World," the nature of God is considered as hereditary rulers, literal gods to their subjects, give up their power when new gods—aliens—come, throwing their culture into chaos.Gender is a constant concern: "The Matter of Seggri" takes place on a planet where women greatly o...

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Publishers Weekly

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(Oct. 1)FYI:In addition to five Hugo and five Nebula awards, Le Guin has won a National Book Award, the Kafka Award and a Pushcart Prize.

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Book Reporter

However, if Alder, who dreams of this kiss night after night, continues to enjoy his reveries, the dead may be able to enter Earthsea through him, a fate he does not wish to fulfill.

Sep 13 2001 | Read Full Review of The Other Wind (The Earthsea ...

SF Site

Once again, Le Guin calls the basis of magery into question -- but she does so this time from within Earthsea, on Earthsea's own terms.

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Boomtron

Reading Ursula Le Guin is an exercise of incredible humility — you’re reminded that domestic details are important: what you eat, your daily chores, your pets, the dreams you have at night, and so on.

Sep 18 2005 | Read Full Review of The Other Wind (The Earthsea ...

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