The Oxford Book of Parodies by John Gross

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...Hugh was in fact the author, writing under a pseudonym, and another winner was Graham, also writing about Hugh. Have you got that? Well, it's all here, in this essential, pretty much unputdownable anthology.
-Guardian

Synopsis

Parodies come in all shapes and sizes. There are broad parodies and subtle parodies, ingenious imitations and knockabout spoofs, scornful lampoons and affectionate pastiches. All these varieties, and many others, appear in this delightful anthology, which has been hailed as "delightful" (Wall Street Journal), "enjoyable" (The New Yorker), and "sparkling" (The Financial Times). The classics of the genre are all here, but so are scores of lesser known but scarcely less brilliant works. At every stage there are surprises. Proust visits Chelsea, Yeats re-writes "Old King Cole," Harry Potter encounters Mick Jagger, a modernized Sermon on the Mount rubs shoulders with an obituary of Sherlock Holmes. The collection provides a hilarious running commentary on literary history, but it also looks beyond literature to include such things as ad parodies, political parodies, and even a scientific hoax. The collection includes work by such accomplished parodists as Max Beerbohm, Robert Benchley, H. L. Mencken, and Evelyn Waugh. And the "victims" include Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Wordsworth, Poe, Longfellow, Emily Dickinson, Cole Porter, Martin Amis, and many others.
 

About John Gross

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John Gross was a major editor and critic who worked for the TLS, the New York Times, and the Sunday Telegraph during his illustrious career.
 
Published September 10, 2010 by Oxford University Press. 366 pages
Genres: Humor & Entertainment, Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction
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Guardian

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Reviewed by Nicholas Lezard on Jan 24 2012

...Hugh was in fact the author, writing under a pseudonym, and another winner was Graham, also writing about Hugh. Have you got that? Well, it's all here, in this essential, pretty much unputdownable anthology.

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