The Paris Review Anthology by George Plimpton

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Venerable at 35 and justly venerated for its unequalled mix of fiction, poetry, interview and essay, the Paris Review remains the single most important little magazine this country has produced. A glimpse through the table of contents of this new compendium will demonstrate why; the editors have launched a thousand careers and consistently published the best work of some of the best writers of our time. —T. Coraghessan Boyle

A selection of representative fiction, nonfiction, and poetry from the Anthology from 1953 to present.

About George Plimpton

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George Ames Plimpton was born March 18, 1927. He was educated first at Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire, and then spent four years at Harvard majoring in English and editing the Harvard Lampoon, followed by two at King's College, Cambridge. Before he left for Cambridge, he served as a tank driver in Italy for the U.S. Army from 1945 through 1948. After graduation, at about 27 years of age, Plimpton went with his friends to Paris. There they founded the Paris Review in 1953 and published poetry and short story writers and did interviews. In the '50s, Plimpton and staff came to New York, where they kept the Review going for half a century. The Review has published over 150 issues. Plimpton also served as a volunteer for Robert Kennedy's 1968 presidential run and was walking in front of him as the candidate was assassinated in the kitchen of a Los Angeles hotel. Plimpton was known as a "participatory journalist". In order to research his books and articles, he quarterbacked in a pre-season NFL game, pitched to several all-stars (retiring Willie Mays and Richie Ashburn) in an exhibition prior to Baseball's 1959 All-Star game, performed as a trapeze artist for the Clyde Beatty-Cole Brothers Circus, and fought boxers Archie Moore and Sugar Ray Robinson. Plimpton was alson known by the nickname the Prince of Cameos for the amount of work he did in films, playing small parts and screenwriting. He was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 2002. Within a month of the academy induction, the French made him a Chevalier, the Legion of Honor's highest rank. The Guild, an arts organization based on Long Island, gave him a lifetime achievement award. Plimpton was also a member of PEN; the Pyrotechnics Guild International; the National Football League Alumni Association; and the Mayflower Descendants Society. In 2003, Plimpton decided to write his memoirs, signing a $750,000 deal with Little, Brown and Co. Before he could finish, George Plimpton died, on September 26, 2003 of natural causes at the age of 76.
Published February 17, 1990 by W. W. Norton & Company. 688 pages
Genres: Education & Reference, Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Paris Review Anthology

The Paris Review

Listen to a preview of Wallace Shawn reading Denis Johnson’s “Car Crash While Hitchhiking,” one of the stories included in the Paris Review anthology Object Lessons: The Paris Review Presents the Art of the Short Story.

Dec 18 2012 | Read Full Review of The Paris Review Anthology

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