The Pasteboard Bandit by Arna Bontemps
(Opie Library)

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 3 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

In this delightful children's tale, an American boy, Kenny Strange, moves to the quiet Mexican town of Taxco with his parents and strikes up a friendship with young Juanito Pérez, a Taxco native. The two boys are brought together by an enchanting toy, the pasteboard bandit Tito. Chosen by Juanito at a town fair from among the other pasteboard toys, Tito, with his colorful clothes and bright eyes, becomes Juanito's and Kenny's constant companion, and the threesome share many adventures in and around the town's rolling green hills. The boys' growing friendship, Kenny's introduction to a culture unlike his own, and Tito's witty reflections on being a toy will be recognized instantly by anyone young or old who has ever made a friend or imagined that a toy might be real.
Originally written in 1935, but never before published, The Pasteboard Bandit grew out of several trips Langston Hughes made to Mexico during his lifetime. Hughes first went to the town of Toluca at age 5 to visit his father, and again when he was older. During these visits, Hughes met many writers and artists, and it is their influence that informs the story of The Pasteboard Bandit--a story of two cultures meeting. When Hughes left Mexico for the last time, at age 32, he was carrying the first draft for The Pasteboard Bandit.
 

About Arna Bontemps

See more books from this Author
Arna Bontemps (1902-1973) was born in Louisiana and grew up in California. He moved to New York City in 1923, and it was there that he met Langston Hughes and other Harlem Renaissance writers. Bontemps is known as one or our major African-American poets, but he is also credited with making black folklore and literature available to the public through his anthologies and through his work as a historian, librarian, and teacher at several American universities. Langston Hughes (1902-1967) was born in Joplin, Missouri, and grew up in Kansas, Illinois, and Ohio. He moved to New York City and lived on 127th Street in Harlem for most of his adult life. One of the most versatile writers of the Harlem Renaissance, Hughes wrote poetry, plays, essays, novels, and short stories. Peggy Turley has a B.A. in history from the University of Memphis, where she studied painting and photography. She lives in Memphis and and is the illustrator of Armadillo Ray. Cheryl A. Wall is Professor of English at Rutgers University.
 
Published November 20, 1997 by Oxford University Press. 96 pages
Genres: Travel, Children's Books. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Pasteboard Bandit

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

The plot is loosely constructed--Juanito takes an entire chapter to nod off after a Christmas Eve posada--and, despite the authors' efforts to depict an international friendship among equals there is still some overt cultural relativism: After several local children fail to break the pi§ata, Kenn...

| Read Full Review of The Pasteboard Bandit (Opie L...

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

A 1935 collaboration between two Harlem Renaissance poets (who had three years earlier published Popo and Fifina), this deceptively simple story was initially rejected by a publisher and, decades late

Nov 03 1997 | Read Full Review of The Pasteboard Bandit (Opie L...

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

A 1935 collaboration between two Harlem Renaissance poets (who had three years earlier published Popo and Fifina), this deceptively simple story was initially rejected by a publisher and, decades later, donated to Yale by Hughes.

| Read Full Review of The Pasteboard Bandit (Opie L...

Rate this book!

Add Review