The People's Act of Love by James Meek

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Synopsis

Set in a time of great social upheaval, warfare, and terrorism, and against a stark, lawless Siberia at the end of the Russian Revolution, The People’s Act of Love portrays the fragile coexistence of a beautiful, independent mother raising her son alone, a megalomaniac Czech captain and his restless regiment, and a mystical separatist Christian sect. When a mysterious, charismatic stranger trudges into their snowy village with a frighteningly outlandish story to tell, its balance is shaken to the core.

 

About James Meek

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James Meek is an award-winning writer whose novels include The People's Act of Love and We Are Now Beginning Our Descent. He lives in London.
 
Published December 1, 2007 by Canongate U.S.. 391 pages
Genres: History, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The People's Act of Love

The New York Times

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WESTERNERS hardly paid attention when the oil magnate Mikhail Khodorkovsky thanked the Russian government for jailing him in the part of Siberia where the Decembrists were exiled, after a failed uprising against the czar in 1825.

Mar 12 2006 | Read Full Review of The People's Act of Love

The Guardian

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The People's Act of Love by James Meek Canongate £12.99, pp400 This powerfully realised novel takes place in 1919 in Yasyk, a little town on the Yenisey river, about as far north as civilised life can be sustained, on the margin of the vast Siberian hinterland of reindeer-herders and the prison c...

Jul 03 2005 | Read Full Review of The People's Act of Love

The Guardian

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The People's Act of Love by James Meek 388pp, Canongate, £12.99 I obtained a proof copy of this spellbinding novel several months ago.

Jul 09 2005 | Read Full Review of The People's Act of Love

The Millions

The soldiers who numbered as many as 40,000 and were stretched out along the length of the Trans-Siberian were, according to John Keegan in his history of World War I under the sway of an anti-Bolshevik officer and were “both in a position and soon in a mood to deny the use of the railway to anyo...

Jan 22 2006 | Read Full Review of The People's Act of Love

London Review of Books

What looks like an act of evil to a single person is the people’s act of love to its future self.’ The equation between the sect and the revolutionary is made by the latter, who is encouraged by the thought that the castrates are living in Yazyk and are not a fable or a distant memory.

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Bookmarks Magazine

The novel’s epigraph, by Russian novelist Andrei Platonov, aptly characterizes the timelessness of humanity’s struggles—and the novel: "Busy remaking the world, man forgot to remake himself."

Aug 28 2007 | Read Full Review of The People's Act of Love

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