The PowerBook by Jeanette Winterson

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Synopsis

Winterson enfolds her seventh novel within the world of computers, and transforms the signal development of our time into a wholly human medium. The story is simple: an e-mail writer called Ali will compose anything you like, on order, provided you're prepared to enter the story as yourself and risk leaving it as someone else. You can be the hero of your own life. You can have freedom just for one night. But there is a price, and Ali discovers that she, too, will have to pay it.

The PowerBook reinvents itself as it travels from London to Paris, Capri, and Cyberspace, using fairy tales, contemporary myths, and popular culture to weave a story of failed but requited love.
 

About Jeanette Winterson

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Jeanette Winterson was born in Manchester, England in 1959 and graduated from St. Catherine's College, Oxford. Her book, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit, is a semi-autobiographical account of her life as a child preacher (she wrote and gave sermons by the time she was eight years old). The book was the winner of the Whitbread Prize for best first fiction and was made into an award-winning TV movie. The Passion won the John Llewelyn Rhys Memorial Prize for best writer under thirty-five, and Sexing the Cherry won the American Academy of Arts and Letters' E. M. Forster Award.
 
Published April 17, 2013 by Vintage. 304 pages
Genres: Education & Reference, Literature & Fiction, Romance, Gay & Lesbian. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The PowerBook

Kirkus Reviews

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Imagine, also, that the person with the Powerbook is a writer, and that someone—the married woman?—e-mails the shopkeeper writer-lover with the request for “Freedom, just for one night.” Imagine that, in response, the writer writes all kinds of different stories—for example, that someone (who?) i...

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Publishers Weekly

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Composed in tight, spare prose echoing Web communications, Winterson's seventh novel takes its cues from the Internet, where reality is implied but never inherent. Like the protagonist of her previous

Oct 02 2000 | Read Full Review of The PowerBook

The Guardian

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The.Powerbook Jeanette Winterson Jonathan Cape, £14.99, 243pp Buy it at BOL "I loved a woman who was married.

Sep 02 2000 | Read Full Review of The PowerBook

The Guardian

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The PowerBook Jeanette Winterson Jonathan Cape £14.99, pp243 Buy it at BOL Jeanette Winterson has changed her name.

Aug 27 2000 | Read Full Review of The PowerBook

Publishers Weekly

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Most conventional, but also most egregious, is a digression recounting Ali's childhood as the adopted daughter of scrap-yard owners who are terrified of straying out into the Wilderness (the real world), but still hope that one day their daughter will find the Promised Land that exists in the heart.

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AV Club

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Turning herself into a 21st-century Scheherazade, she constructs stories to reflect and illuminate their relationship while trying to meet the seemingly impossible demand of a love story without an either/or ending.

Mar 29 2002 | Read Full Review of The PowerBook

London Review of Books

Towards the end of Art Objects Winterson quotes a long passage, the one in which Woolf thinks ahead ‘another century or so’ to when women ‘have five hundred a year each of us and rooms of our own’ and ‘see human beings not always in their relation to each other but in relation to reality’: ‘then ...

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