The Purpose of the Past by GordonS. Wood
Reflections on the Uses of History

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 7 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

An erudite scholar and an elegant writer, Gordon S. Wood has won both numerous awards and a broad readership since the 1969 publication of his widely acclaimed The Creation of the American Republic. With The Purpose of the Past, Wood has essentially created a history of American history, assessing the current state of history vis-à-vis the work of some of its most important scholars-doling out praise and scorn with equal measure. In this wise, passionate defense of history's ongoing necessity, Wood argues that we cannot make intelligent decisions about the future without understanding our past. Wood offers a master's insight into what history-at its best-can be and reflects on its evolving and essential role in our culture.


 

About GordonS. Wood

See more books from this Author
GORDON S. WOOD is the Alva O. Way University Professor and a professor of history at Brown University. His 1969 book, The Creation of the American Republic 1776-1787, received the Bancroft and John H. Dunning prizes and was nominated for the National Book Award. His 1992 book, The Radicalism of the American Revolution, won the Pulitzer Prize and the Emerson Prize. His most recent book, Empire of Liberty, won the 2010 New-York Historical Society Prize in American History. Wood contributes regularly to The New Republic and The New York Review of Books.
 
Published March 13, 2008 by Penguin Books. 348 pages
Genres: History. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Purpose of the Past

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

Thus James McGregor Burns, for instance, comes in for a shellacking in a 1982 New York Review of Books piece for imagining in The Vineyard of Liberty that the 1850s were, like the 1960s, full of revolutionary potential, lacking but a sans-culotte leader to set things in motion: “But then one some...

| Read Full Review of The Purpose of the Past: Refl...

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

The subtitle of this latest offering from Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Wood (The Radicalism of the American Revolution ) is far grander than what he del

Dec 17 2007 | Read Full Review of The Purpose of the Past: Refl...

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

The subtitle of this latest offering from Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Wood (The Radicalism of the American Revolution ) is far grander than what he delivers between the covers: a collection of 21 book reviews of works by Simon Schama, Theodore Draper and Joyce Appleby, among others, written ...

| Read Full Review of The Purpose of the Past: Refl...

Review (Barnes & Noble)

History departments appear to have stopped hiring anyone but cultural historians, the assumption being that cultural history is the only kind of history worth doing."

Mar 27 2008 | Read Full Review of The Purpose of the Past: Refl...

Deseret News

In a Nutshell: This intriguing book comprises 21 energetic essays written by Gordon Wood, who has been called "the pre-eminent historian of the Revolution."

Mar 23 2008 | Read Full Review of The Purpose of the Past: Refl...

Bookmarks Magazine

With The Purpose of the Past, Wood has essentially created a history of American history, assessing the current state of history vis-à-vis the work of some of its most important scholars-doling out praise and scorn with equal measure.

Apr 10 2008 | Read Full Review of The Purpose of the Past: Refl...

Mises Institute

In warning of a Federalist plot to establish monarchy, Wood tells us in a review of Stanley Elkins and Eric McKitrick, The Age of Federalism, Madison and Jefferson were by no means deluded: Yet there was truth in the Republican invective, for Hamilton and other Federalist leaders … wanted to t...

| Read Full Review of The Purpose of the Past: Refl...

Reader Rating for The Purpose of the Past
72%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 23 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×