The Radical and the Republican by James Oakes
Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics

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Synopsis

"A great American tale told with a deft historical eye, painstaking analysis, and a supple clarity of writing.”—Jean Baker


“My husband considered you a dear friend,” Mary Todd Lincoln wrote to Frederick Douglass in the weeks after Lincoln’s assassination. The frontier lawyer and the former slave, the cautious politician and the fiery reformer, the President and the most famous black man in America—their lives traced different paths that finally met in the bloody landscape of secession, Civil War, and emancipation. Opponents at first, they gradually became allies, each influenced by and attracted to the other. Their three meetings in the White House signaled a profound shift in the direction of the Civil War, and in the fate of the United States. James Oakes has written a masterful narrative history, bringing two iconic figures to life and shedding new light on the central issues of slavery, race, and equality in Civil War America.
 

About James Oakes

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James Oakes is a Distinguished Professor of History and Graduate School Humanities Professor at the City University of New York Graduate Center. He is the author of several acclaimed works on the South and the Civil War, including The Radical and the Republican: Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics, winner of the Lincoln Prize. He and his family live in New York City.
 
Published February 7, 2011 by W. W. Norton & Company. 352 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Political & Social Sciences, War. Non-fiction

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Kirkus Reviews

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Slavery and Freedom: An Interpretation of the Old South, 1998, etc.) of how Lincoln the politician and Douglass the reformer worked, separately and together, to abolish slavery in America.

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Publishers Weekly

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Lincoln began as a moderate who advocated banning slavery in the territories while tolerating it in the South, rejected social equality for blacks and wanted to send freedmen overseas—and wound up abolishing slavery outright and increasingly supporting black voting rights.

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George (who had also written the previous majority opinion in favor of same-sex marriage), took great pains to insist that the main issue before the court was not the merits or demerits of same-sex marriage, but instead a strictly legal question of who gets to change the language of the state con...

Jun 04 2009 | Read Full Review of The Radical and the Republica...

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The upper echelons of the health insurance industry are in a symbiotic relationship with Wall St. By Anarcissie, December 3, 2011 at 8:20 am Link to this comment.

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T., September 18, 2008 at 3:39 pm Link to this comment.

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Interestingly, whilst conspiracies by the imperium are dismissed with tedious regularity as fantasies, no such incredulity is found when it comes to ‘al-Qu’eda’, yet the sheer volume of bullshit surrounding the existence of ‘Osama’s international network of terrorists’ reveals not a shred of evid...

May 20 2007 | Read Full Review of The Radical and the Republica...

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