The Rainbabies by Laura Krauss Melmed

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Synopsis

In the magic of a moonshower, a childless couple find a dozen tiny babies in the grass. Small enough to rock to sleep in a pair of wooden shoes, the children never grow. Even the tiniest babies can bring big adventures, though, and these little ones seem to find trouble as easily as bees find flowers. But the old couple's love never waivers and in the end they are rewarded with their hearts' desire.

Written in classic folktale tradition, illustrated with astonishing paintings, this beautiful story is woven from magic and moonbeams.

 

About Laura Krauss Melmed

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Laura Krauss Melmed is author of "Capital! Washington D. Laura Krauss Melmed is author of "Capital! Washington D.C. from A to Z" and "New York, New York! The Big Apple from C. from A to Z" and "New York, New York! The Big Apple from A to Z", also illustrated by FranE Lessac; "I Love You As MuA to Z", also illustrated by FranE Lessac; "I Love You As Much . . . ", illustrated by Henri Sorensen; and the criticallch . . . ", illustrated by Henri Sorensen; and the critically acclaimed "The Rainbabies", illustrated by Jim LaMarche. Sy acclaimed "The Rainbabies", illustrated by Jim LaMarche. She lives with her husband in Washington, D.C. he lives with her husband in Washington, D.C. Jim LaMarche wrote and illustrated "The Raft". He also ilJim LaMarche wrote and illustrated "The Raft". He also illustrated "Little Oh" and "The Rainbabies", both by Laura Krlustrated "Little Oh" and "The Rainbabies", both by Laura Krauss Melmed. He lives in Santa Cruz, California. In His Own auss Melmed. He lives in Santa Cruz, California. In His Own Words... "It's funny how things turn out. I wasn't one oWords... "It's funny how things turn out. I wasn't one of those kids with a clear vision of the future, the ones whof those kids with a clear vision of the future, the ones who know at age five that they will be writers or doctors or ar know at age five that they will be writers or doctors or artists. I liked to draw, but then, so did most of the kids I tists. I liked to draw, but then, so did most of the kids I knew, and growing up to be an artist never really occurred tknew, and growing up to be an artist never really occurred to me. What I did want to be, in order of preference, was a mo me. What I did want to be, in order of preference, was a magician, Davy Crockett, a doctor, a priest (until I found ouagician, Davy Crockett, a doctor, a priest (until I found out they couldn't get married), and a downhill ski racer. t they couldn't get married), and a downhill ski racer. "But I always loved to make things, and once I got going on "But I always loved to make things, and once I got going on a project I loved, I stuck with it. Once, when I was five ora project I loved, I stuck with it. Once, when I was five or six, I cut a thousand cloth feathers out of an old sheet, w six, I cut a thousand cloth feathers out of an old sheet, which I then attempted to glue to my bony little body. I was hich I then attempted to glue to my bony little body. I was sure I could have flown off the back porch if I'd just had asure I could have flown off the back porch if I'd just had a better glue. Another time I dug up some smooth blue-gray cl better glue. Another time I dug up some smooth blue-gray clay from the field behind our house, then molded it into an eay from the field behind our house, then molded it into an entire zoo, dried the animals in the sun, and painted them asntire zoo, dried the animals in the sun, and painted them as realistically as I could. I made a grotto out of cement, a realistically as I could. I made a grotto out of cement, a shoe box, and my fossil collection. I made moccasins out of shoe box, and my fossil collection. I made moccasins out of an old deerhide I found in the basement. "I grew up in tan old deerhide I found in the basement. "I grew up in the little Wisconsin town of Kewaskum, the soul of which was he little Wisconsin town of Kewaskum, the soul of which was the Milwaukee River. In the summer we rafted on it and swam the Milwaukee River. In the summer we rafted on it and swam in it. In the winter we skated on it, sometimes traveling miin it. In the winter we skated on it, sometimes traveling miles upriver. In the spring and fall my dad took us on long cles upriver. In the spring and fall my dad took us on long canoe trips, silently sneaking up on deer, heron, and fields anoe trips, silently sneaking up on deer, heron, and fields of a thousand Canada geese. And almost all year long we fishof a thousand Canada geese. And almost all year long we fished for bullheads and northerns from the dam. "I began coed for bullheads and northerns from the dam. "I began college at the University of Wisconsin as a biology major, butllege at the University of Wisconsin as a biology major, but somewhere along the line--I'm not sure when or even why--I somewhere along the line--I'm not sure when or even why--I switched to art, and graduated with a bachelor of science deswitched to art, and graduated with a bachelor of science degree in art. I still had no idea of becoming a professional gree in art. I still had no idea of becoming a professional artist, however. In the meantime, I joined VISTA (Volunteersartist, however. In the meantime, I joined VISTA (Volunteers in Service to America) and moved to Bismarck, North Dakota, in Service to America) and moved to Bismarck, North Dakota, to work with United Tribes of North Dakota creating school to work with United Tribes of North Dakota creating school curriculum materials. It was a great job. Because there werecurriculum materials. It was a great job. Because there were only a few of us, I was able to try my hand at a little of only a few of us, I was able to try my hand at a little of everything: writing, graphic design, photography, and illusteverything: writing, graphic design, photography, and illustration. It was then that I slowly realized that it might be ration. It was then that I slowly realized that it might be possible for me to make a living at art. I moved to Californpossible for me to make a living at art. I moved to California, and in the evenings-after working all day as a carpenteria, and in the eveni
 
Published January 1, 1994 by Scholastic. 34 pages
Genres: Children's Books, Literature & Fiction, Humor & Entertainment. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Rainbabies

Publishers Weekly

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A childless couple finds a dozen tiny rainbabies and cares for them until their real mother arrives to claim her offspring. Calling the writing "flawless" and the paintings "equally mas

Feb 16 2004 | Read Full Review of The Rainbabies

Publishers Weekly

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Melmed's writing is flawless, her storyline clean and unaffected: a childless couple finds a dozen tiny rainbabies in the grass after a moonshower, takes them home and tenderly cares for them until the babies' real mother arrives to claim her offspring and reward the devoted husband and wife.

| Read Full Review of The Rainbabies

Publishers Weekly

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A childless couple finds a dozen tiny rainbabies and cares for them until their real mother arrives to claim her offspring.

| Read Full Review of The Rainbabies

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