The Range Eternal by Louise Erdrich

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In the thick of the Turtle Mountains, inside one family`s little cabin, stood The Range Eternal. The woodburning stove provided warmth and comfort, delicious soups, and hot potatoes to warm cold hands on frozen winter mornings. It provided a glowing screen for a young girl`s imagination, and protection from the howling ice monsters in the night. But most of all, it was the true heart of the home-one the young girl never knew how much she would miss until it was gone. Louise Erdrich is the author of many acclaimed and best-selling books, including The Birchbark House, a National Book Award Finalist. She is a member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Ojibwa and lives in Minneapolis. Steve Johnson and Lou Fancher, an award-winning illustration team, have collaborated on many picture books, including My Many Colored Days by Dr. Seuss; Cat, You Better Come Home by Garrison Keillor; Horsefly by Alice Hoffman; and Robin`s Room by Margaret Wise Brown.

 

About Louise Erdrich

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Karen Louise Erdrich was born on June 7, 1954 in Little Falls, Minnesota. Erdrich grew up in Wahpeton, North Dakota, where both of her parents were employed by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. She is a member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa. Erdrich graduated from Dartmouth College in 1976 with an AB degree, and she received a Master of Arts in creative writing from Johns Hopkins University in 1979. Erdrich published a number of poems and short stories from 1978 to 1982. In 1981 she married author and anthropologist Michael Dorris, and together they published The World's Greatest Fisherman, which won the Nelson Algren Award in 1982. In 1984 she won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Love Medicine, which is an expansion of a story that she had co-written with Dorris. Love Medicine was also awarded the Virginia McCormick Scully Prize (1984), the Sue Kaufman Prize (1985) and the Los Angeles Times Award for best novel (1985). In addition to her prose, Erdrich has written several volumes of poetry, a textbook, children's books, and short stories and essays for popular magazines. She has been the recipient of numerous awards for professional excellence, including the National Magazine Fiction Award in 1983 and a first-prize O. Henry Award in 1987. Erdrich has also received the Pushcart Prize in Poetry, the Western Literacy Association Award, the 1999 World Fantasy Award, and the Scott O'Dell Award for Historical Fiction in 2006. In 2007 she refused to accept an honorary doctorate from the University of North Dakota in protest of its use of the "Fighting Sioux" name and logo. Erdrich's novel The Round House made the New York Times bestseller list in 2013. Steve Johnson has written more than 20 books on a variety of computer software, including Microsoft Office XP, Windows XP, and Macromedia Director MX and Fireworks. In 1991, after working for Apple Computer and Microsoft, Steve founded Perspection, Inc. Perspection, Inc. is a software training company committed to providing performance-based training to help people effectively and efficiently use computer technology. Perspection writes and produces software training books, and develops Web-based training for Windows and Macintosh personal computers. Since 1991 they have written more than 60 computer books and sold over 4.5 million copies. Steve Johnson and Lou Fancher are an illustration team with more than forty picture books in print. Their work has garnered rave reviews and won awards. Their books include My Many Colored Days, Bebop Express, I Walk at Night, New York's Bravest, The Velveteen Rabbit, and The Salamander Room. They were also concept artists for Pixar's Toy Story and A Bug's Life. They live in California with their son.
 
Published September 1, 2002 by Hyperion. 32 pages
Genres: Travel, Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

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Then, while remembering how its warmth used to keep the wintry Windigo at bay on cold nights, the narrator recalls peering into its firebox, and being carried away on its flames and smoke: “I saw the range of the buffalo .

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Publishers Weekly

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As she looks through the stove's window, the girl sees in its flames "pictures of long ago" that conjure up a range of another kind ("I saw the range of the buffalo...

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