The Red Tent by Anita Diamant
A Novel

67%

10 Critic Reviews

While I didn’t love it, and to be honest lost some interest by the third section of the book, I did enjoy it quite a bit, and I’m glad to have read it. Seeing an old story retold from the perspective of those who were originally in the margins is something I’m always interested in.
-Things Mean a Lot

Synopsis

Her name is Dinah. In the Bible, her life is only hinted at in a brief and violent detour within the more familiar chapters of the Book of Genesis that are about her father, Jacob, and his dozen sons.

Told in Dinah's voice, this novel reveals the traditions and turmoils of ancient womanhood-the world of the red tent. It begins with the story of her mothers-Leah, Rachel, Zilpah, and Bilhah-the four wives of Jacob. They love Dinah and give her gifts that are to sustain her through a damaged youth, a calling to midwifery, and a new home in a foreign land. Dinah's story reaches out from a remarkable period of early history and creates an intimate, immediate connection.

Deeply affecting, The Red Tent combines rich storytelling with a valuable achievement in modern fiction: a new view of Biblical women's society.

 

About Anita Diamant

See more books from this Author
Anita Diamant is the bestselling author of the novels The Red Tent, Good Harbor, and The Last Days of Dogtown, as well as the collection of essays, Pitching My Tent. An award-winning journalist whose work has appeared regularly in The Boston Globe Magazine and Parenting, she is the author of six nonfiction guides to contemporary Jewish life. She lives in Massachusetts. Her most recent novel is Day After Night. Visit her website at www.anitadiamant.com.
 
Published April 1, 2010 by St. Martin's Press. 336 pages
Genres: Religion & Spirituality, Literature & Fiction, Education & Reference, History. Fiction
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Critic reviews for The Red Tent
All: 10 | Positive: 7 | Negative: 3

Kirkus

Above average
on May 20 2010

With stirring scenery and a narrative of force and color, a readable tale marked by hortatory fulminations and voluptuous lamentations. For a liberal Bible audience with a possible spillover to the Bradley relationship.

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Publishers Weekly

Above average
on Dec 09 2015

Despite a few unprofitable digressions, Diamant succeeds admirably in depicting the lives of women in the age that engendered our civilization and our most enduring values.

Read Full Review of The Red Tent: A Novel | See more reviews from Publishers Weekly

Pajiba

Below average
Reviewed by gorvitron on Jul 10 2012

Overall, an interesting read, especially if you have any sort of religious background, but not most the skillfully written novel. Diamant clearly has a knack for the imaginative, but her ability to craft a sentence that leaves you in love with words isn't quite up to par.

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Curious Book Fans

Below average
Reviewed by eilidhcatriona on Jan 11 2011

While I did, on the whole, enjoy The Red Tent, I could have enjoyed it more and I was disappointed with the second part of the story.

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Stuff

Above average
Reviewed by Karen Tay on Apr 18 2013

What I particularly enjoyed about this book was its depiction of the red tent...I'll leave the more graphic details up to Diamant when you read the novel; but it's worth noting that this is a work of literature, so therefore not all the historical points are accurate.

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Stew Over

Good
Reviewed by Lisa on Feb 23 2012

The most important point of the book, in my opinion, is that Dinah is not a victim. She is strong, raised by four very different women. She does not live in the shadow of her brothers, and she is independent in nature. I highly enjoyed this book, and I hope you will give it a try.

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Curled Up

Above average
Reviewed by Mary B. Stuart on Aug 18 2014

The novel is actually two books...The first, the story of Rachel and Leah, is the shorter of the two...and the less successful...But that changes with the story of Dinah. Here is where the true novel begins. Here is where the author successfully leaves behind her nonfictional roots and creates a true novel.

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Things Mean a Lot

Above average
Reviewed by Ana S on Sep 10 2009

While I didn’t love it, and to be honest lost some interest by the third section of the book, I did enjoy it quite a bit, and I’m glad to have read it. Seeing an old story retold from the perspective of those who were originally in the margins is something I’m always interested in.

Read Full Review of The Red Tent: A Novel

Musings of a Bookish Kitty

Good
Reviewed by Literary Feline on Aug 04 2009

By the time I finished the last chapter of the book, I felt satisfied. There is so much more I could say about this book. It is full of nuances I have not even begun to touch here. Even with those moments when I doubted the book would live up to my expectations, I can truly say this is a book well worth reading.

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http://www.cpa-booksandmoviesreviews.com

Good
Reviewed by Carmen on Oct 22 2014

While I was reading I could only marvel at this work of creative genius, because it takes courage to add missing pieces to the most read text in the world since the invention of the printing press.

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Alexandra Goodman 14 Jan 2015

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