The Right To Privacy by Caroline Kennedy

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Synopsis

Can the police strip-search a woman who has been arrested for a minor traffic violation? Can a magazine publish an embarrassing photo of you without your permission? Does your boss have the right to read your email? Can a company monitor its employees' off-the-job lifestyles--and fire those who drink, smoke, or live with a partner of the same sex? Although the word privacy does not appear in the Constitution, most of us believe that we have an inalienable right to be left alone. Yet in arenas that range from the battlefield of abortion to the information highway, privacy is under siege. In this eye-opening and sometimes hair-raising book, Alderman and Kennedy survey hundreds of recent cases in which ordinary citizens have come up against the intrusions of government, businesses, the news media, and their own neighbors. At once shocking and instructive, up-to-date and rich in historical perspective, The Right to Private is an invaluable guide to one of the most charged issues of our time.



"Anyone hoping to understand the sometimes precarious state of privacy in modern America should start by reading this book."--Washington Post Book World


"Skillfully weaves together unfamiliar, dramatic case histories...a book with impressive breadth."--Time


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

About Caroline Kennedy

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Foreword by Caroline Kennedy, the author/editor of ten bestselling books on constitutional law, American history, politics, and poetry. A graduate of Harvard University and Columbia Law School, Kennedy is active in the efforts to improve New York City public schools and serves as President of the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation.
 
Published September 29, 2010 by Vintage. 434 pages
Genres: Political & Social Sciences, Education & Reference, Literature & Fiction, Law & Philosophy, Professional & Technical, Computers & Technology. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Right To Privacy

Kirkus Reviews

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But too much here is superficial: The authors recite the facts, describe the privacy issues involved, mention competing interests (such as freedom of the press), and cite related cases without comment.

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Publishers Weekly

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Coauthors of In Our Defense: The Bill of Rights in Action, Alderman and Kennedy here present a pithy and practical casebook on our shrinking right to privacy. The Fourth Amendment, protecting against

Oct 02 1995 | Read Full Review of The Right To Privacy

Publishers Weekly

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Coauthors of In Our Defense: The Bill of Rights in Action, Alderman and Kennedy here present a pithy and practical casebook on our shrinking right to privacy.

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Entertainment Weekly

If anybody in America is entitled to have an attitude about issues of personal privacy, it would seem to be Caroline Kennedy.

Dec 22 1995 | Read Full Review of The Right To Privacy

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