The Right to Vote by Alexander Keyssar
The Contested History of Democracy in the United States

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Synopsis

Originally published in 2000, The Right to Vote was widely hailed as a magisterial account of the evolution of suffrage from the American Revolution to the end of the twentieth century. In this revised and updated edition, Keyssar carries the story forward, from the disputed presidential contest of 2000 through the 2008 campaign and the election of Barack Obama. The Right to Vote is a sweeping reinterpretation of American political history as well as a meditation on the meaning of democracy in contemporary American life.
 

About Alexander Keyssar

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Alexander Keyssar is Matthew W. Stirling Jr. Professor of History and Social Policy at Harvard University. He is a specialist in late-nineteenth- and twentieth-century social and political history. His first book, Out of Work: The First Century of Unemployment in Massachusetts, won the Frederick Jackson Turner Award of the Organization of American Historians. His most recent book is The Right to Vote: The Contested History of Democracy in the United States, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and winner of the Albert J. Beveridge Award of the American Historical Association.
 
Published June 30, 2009 by Basic Books. 272 pages
Genres: History, Political & Social Sciences, Professional & Technical, Law & Philosophy, Education & Reference, Biographies & Memoirs, Humor & Entertainment. Non-fiction

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The impress of E. P. Thompson and the postwar school of British labor history has begun to reach American historians; it is all-pervasive in this collection of essays on industrialization, immigration, and the working-class subcultures of America (to 1919).

Apr 12 1976 | Read Full Review of The Right to Vote: The Contes...

Publishers Weekly

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HAmerica's self-image as the land of democracy flows from the belief that we've long enjoyed universal suffrageDor at least aspired to it. Duke historian Keyssar (Out of Work: The First Century of Une

Jul 31 2000 | Read Full Review of The Right to Vote: The Contes...

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