The Romanovs by Robert K. Massie
the Final Chapter

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Synopsis

In July 1991, nine skeletons were exhumed from a shallow mass grave near Ekaterinburg, Siberia, a few miles from the infamous cellar room where the last tsar and his family had been murdered seventy-three years before. But were these the bones of the Romanovs? And if these were their remains, where were the bones of the two younger Romanovs supposedly murdered with the rest of the family? Was Anna Anderson, celebrated for more than sixty years in newspapers, books, and film, really Grand Duchess Anastasia? The Romanovs provides the answers, describing in suspenseful detail the dramatic efforts to discover the truth. Pulitzer Prize winner Robert K. Massie presents a colorful panorama of contemporary characters, illuminating the major scientific dispute between Russian experts and a team of Americans, whose findings, along with those of DNA scientists from Russia, America, and Great Britain, all contributed to solving one of the great mysteries of the twentieth century.

 

About Robert K. Massie

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Robert K. Massie was born in Lexington, Kentucky, and studied American history at Yale and European history at Oxford, which he attended as a Rhodes Scholar. He was president of the Authors Guild from 1987 to 1991. His books include Nicholas and Alexandra, Peter the Great: His Life and World (for which he won a Pulitzer Prize for biography), The Romanovs: The Final Chapter, Dreadnought: Britain, Germany, and the Coming of the Great War, Castles of Steel: Britain, Germany, and the Winning of the Great War at Sea, and Catherine the Great: Portrait of a Woman.
 
Published February 22, 2012 by Random House. 320 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Political & Social Sciences, Literature & Fiction, Education & Reference, Travel. Non-fiction

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Pulitzer Prizewinning author Massie, whose 1967 Nicholas and Alexandra received high praise, has used new documents on the assassination of the Romanovs to write a sequel that is almost as much thriller as historical account.

May 20 2010 | Read Full Review of The Romanovs: the Final Chapter

Publishers Weekly

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A recounting of recent controversies in Russia over the burial of the remains of the last imperial family, killed during the Communist revolution. (Oct.)

Oct 02 1996 | Read Full Review of The Romanovs: the Final Chapter

Publishers Weekly

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In death as in life, the last imperial Romanovs cause controversy. Their bones remain in the Ekaterinburg morgue because of disagreements within the Russian bureaucracy, within the Russian Orthodox Ch

Oct 02 1995 | Read Full Review of The Romanovs: the Final Chapter

Publishers Weekly

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A recounting of recent controversies in Russia over the burial of the remains of the last imperial family, killed during the Communist revolution.

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Publishers Weekly

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Then began the exploitation, which, as Massie relates the story, will leave readers astonished and angry: scientists who identified the bones criticized one another's expertise for questionable motives, and the cities of Ekaterinburg and Petersburg are still quarreling over custody of the remains...

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Examiner

There is no doubt Massie did his research and was able to present the facts to you by telling a story, but unless you really want to know exactly every bullet, every bayonet piercing, and every chemical detail, some facts are better left unsaid.

Mar 10 2012 | Read Full Review of The Romanovs: the Final Chapter

Los Angeles Times

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Simpson trial.) In the end, with the help of blood drawn from Romanov's descendants, including Prince Philip, it was established that the bones belonged to Nicholas and Alexandra, the grand duchesses Olga, Marie and Tatiana;

Dec 17 1995 | Read Full Review of The Romanovs: the Final Chapter

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