The Rubbish on Our Plates by Fabien Perucca

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Synopsis

This is an expose of the whole modern agricultural industry. From Alzheimer's and cancer to obesity and impotence, many of the late-20th century's major illnesses can be traced to the chemical toxins in our food from industrial farming and environmental pollution. This book contains stories from history, such as the Romans who were poisoned by the lead in their water and wine, together with the latest facts and evidence. It exposes the high rate of cancer among farmers, how human obesity may be caused by the growth hormones given to livestock, and why vets in Belgium are accompanied on farm visits by armed police. Subjects covered in the book include the effects of nuclear, industrial, and car pollution on the food chain; chemical additives; pesticides and fungicides; growth-promoting hormones in livestock; depletion of fish stocks; factory farming; new food products using "chemical special effects;" animal transportation; industrial cover-ups of health risks; and the fallibility of consumer protection.
 

About Fabien Perucca

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Published October 1, 1996 by Prion. 240 pages
Genres: Business & Economics, Health, Fitness & Dieting, Political & Social Sciences, Education & Reference, Professional & Technical, Science & Math. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Rubbish on Our Plates

Publishers Weekly

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The authors, French investigative journalists, here examine agriculture and its products as they come to our tables. Perucca and Pouradier begin with stomach-turning scenes from China, in particular t

Feb 02 1997 | Read Full Review of The Rubbish on Our Plates

Publishers Weekly

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The authors, French investigative journalists, here examine agriculture and its products as they come to our tables.

| Read Full Review of The Rubbish on Our Plates

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