The Russian Revolution by Sean McMeekin
A New History

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Despite the glaring divergence between its objective and its content, this fluid work offers an overview of the revolution’s wartime context.
-Publishers Weekly

Synopsis

In The Russian Revolution, historian Sean McMeekin traces the origins and events of the Russian Revolution, which ended Romanov rule, ushered the Bolsheviks into power, and changed the course of world history. Between 1900 and 1920, Russia underwent a complete and irreversible transformation: by the end of these two decades, a new regime was in place, the economy had collapsed, and over 20 million Russians had died during the revolution and what followed. Still, Bolshevik power remained intact due to a remarkable combination of military prowess, violent terror tactics, and the failures of their opposition. And as McMeekin shows, Russia's revolutionaries were aided at nearly every step by countries like Germany and Sweden who sought to benefit--politically and economically--from the chaotic changes overtaking the country.

The first comprehensive history of these momentous events in a decade, The Russian Revolution combines cutting-edge scholarship and a fast-paced narrative to shed new light on a great turning point of the twentieth century.
 

About Sean McMeekin

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Sean McMeekin is an assistant professor of history at Koç University. He is the author of four highly acclaimed books, including The Russian Origins of the First World War, which won the World War One Historical Association's Tomlinson Prize, and The Berlin to Baghdad Express, which won the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies' Barbara Jelavich Book Prize. McMeekin lives in Istanbul, Turkey.
 
Published May 30, 2017 by Basic Books.
Genres: History, Travel. Non-fiction
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Critic reviews for The Russian Revolution
All: 2 | Positive: 1 | Negative: 1

Kirkus

Good
on Mar 21 2017

McMeekin effectively shows how easily one man could undermine the foundations of a nation, and he makes the revolution comprehensible as he exposes the deviousness of its leader.

Read Full Review of The Russian Revolution: A New... | See more reviews from Kirkus

Publishers Weekly

Above average
on Sep 28 2017

Despite the glaring divergence between its objective and its content, this fluid work offers an overview of the revolution’s wartime context.

Read Full Review of The Russian Revolution: A New... | See more reviews from Publishers Weekly

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