The Science of Supervillains by Lois H. Gresh

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Synopsis

The authors of The Science of Superheroes now reveal the real genius of the most evil geniuses
Ever wonder why comic book villains, such as Spiderman's bionic archenemy Dr. Octopus or the X-Men's eternal rival Magneto, are so scary and so much fun? It's not just their diabolical talent for confounding our heroes, it's their unrivalled techno-proficiency at creating global mayhem that keeps comic book fans captivated. But is any of the science actually true? In The Science of Supervillains, authors Lois Gresh and Bob Weinberg present a highly entertaining and informative look at the mind-boggling wizardry behind the comic book world's legendary baddies. Whether it's artificial intelligence, weapons systems, anti-matter, robotics, or magnetic flux theory, this fun, fact-filled book is a fascinating excursion into the real-world science animating the genius in the comic book world's pantheon of evil geniuses.
Lois Gresh (Scottsville, NY) and Bob Weinberg (Oak Forest, IL) are the authors of the popular Science of Superheroes (cloth: 0-471-0246-0; paper: 0-471-46882-7)
 

About Lois H. Gresh

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Lois H. Gresh is the New York Times bestselling author of many books, including The Twilight Companion and other fans' guides, as well as science fiction novels and stories. She lives in upstate New York.
 
Published August 15, 2007 by Wiley. 236 pages
Genres: Political & Social Sciences, Comics & Graphic Novels, Education & Reference, Humor & Entertainment, Literature & Fiction, Science & Math. Non-fiction

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The authors of The Science of Superheroes turn their attention to the heroes' spectacular foes in order to uncover just how worried we need to be that some day a Magneto, Dr. Octopus or Lex Luthor may

Oct 18 2004 | Read Full Review of The Science of Supervillains

Publishers Weekly

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Human characters, not science, are the heart of King's fiction, but Gresh and Weinberg (The Science of James Bond ) use these tales as a jumping-off point in their latest pop-sci tie-in.

Jul 23 2007 | Read Full Review of The Science of Supervillains

Publishers Weekly

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Everyone knows which secret agent drives a car that turns into a boat at the flick of a switch, leaves fake fingerprints and, of course drinks his martinis shaken, not stirred: Bond.

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