The Seacunny by Gerard Woodward

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 2 Critic Reviews

The Seacunny is a diverse book, and yet its focus is often domestic – a series of philosophical proofs of the existence of poodles stands next to an account of the difficulty of telling actual bears apart from people wearing bear-suits...
-Guardian

Synopsis

Gerard Woodward's poetry has long been admired for its sharp and unflinching eye, its fearless surrealism, its blacker-than-black humour, and its ability to find a little abyss in any detail, no matter how innocuous or domestic. Here, his considerations of trampolines, bird-tables and lightbulbs will leave the reader unable to regard those things in quite the same way again; they will also find science-fiction novels compressed to a few stanzas, strange potted biographies, and lists of edicts from long-dead tyrants. However, The Seacunny finds this inimitable voice extend itself in new and unexpected directions, with the poet turning to the natural world and to human relationships in ways that are affecting as they are surprising. This is a book of astonishing range, and declares a new lyric direction in Woodward's poetry.
 

About Gerard Woodward

See more books from this Author
Gerard Woodward is the author of an acclaimed trilogy comprising: August (shortlisted for the 2001 Whitbread First Novel Award), I'll Go to Bed at Noon (shortlisted for the 2004 Man Booker Prize) and A Curious Earth. He was born in London in 1961, and published several prize-winning collections of poetry before turning to fiction. His latest collection of poetry, We Were Pedestrians was shortlisted for the 2005 T.S.Eliot Prize. He is Professor of Creative Writing at Bath Spa University.
 
Published October 11, 2012 by Picador. 64 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for The Seacunny
All: 2 | Positive: 2 | Negative: 0

Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Sean O'Brien on Jan 18 2013

The Seacunny is a diverse book, and yet its focus is often domestic – a series of philosophical proofs of the existence of poodles stands next to an account of the difficulty of telling actual bears apart from people wearing bear-suits...

Read Full Review of The Seacunny | See more reviews from Guardian

Guardian

Good
Reviewed by Kate Kellaway on Dec 23 2012

This is a rare collection of wit, oddity and beauty ...With this collection, it was love at first read. I shall never look at a field of cows again without thinking of this book.

Read Full Review of The Seacunny | See more reviews from Guardian

Rate this book!

Add Review