The Searchers by Joseph Ollivier

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...it’s an odd contradiction to the Rangers’ interrogative methods, like waterboarding or convincing someone he’s eating his own flesh— when what he’s actually consuming isn’t much better. Real-world characters should engage readers, though the R-rated scenes aren’t as muted as the author perhaps intended.
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Synopsis

Jim Warwick has a prosthetic leg with plates and screws in his shoulder and eye socket—all results of a tour of duty in the Middle East as an Army Ranger. But now he views the area from a different viewpoint: as an analyst for the department of defense decoding Arabic-language messages.

He met Julie, the nurse who helped him through his recovery; she eventually became his wife. Julie is a UNICEF representative on assignment to Oman and Yemen to evaluate children’s health programs. Jim did all he could to discourage her from going on this trip. Unfortunately his concern was justified as she and three other UN representatives were kidnapped. A week later, because of a botched ransom payoff, one of the UN representatives was stoned to death—the event broadcast worldwide.

Not sure where the kidnappers might hold her, and frustrated with his own government’s lack of effort, Jim gathers his four best friends—all army rangers—which starts an improbable search across the deep deserts of five Middle East countries.

The Searchers is a thrilling adventure full of devotion, strength of character, geography, and history. It will captivate and inspire readers from beginning to end.

 

About Joseph Ollivier

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Published May 23, 2015 by Tales Untold. 406 pages
Genres: Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Action & Adventure, Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Kirkus

Below average
on Jun 02 2016

...it’s an odd contradiction to the Rangers’ interrogative methods, like waterboarding or convincing someone he’s eating his own flesh— when what he’s actually consuming isn’t much better. Real-world characters should engage readers, though the R-rated scenes aren’t as muted as the author perhaps intended.

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