The Senility of Vladimir P by Michael Honig

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As Sheremetev sinks deeper and the novel enters its final, page-turning, stretch — Honig is an adroit plotter — the author loses faith in his readers and begins to spell out not only what’s happening but the extent of Russia’s tragedy.
-NY Times

Synopsis

A biting satire of a particular despot and a deeply human allegory of the fragility of goodness and the contagion of unchecked power.


Set twenty-odd years from now, it opens on Patient Number One—Vladimir Putin, largely forgotten in his presidential dacha, serviced by a small coterie of house staff, drifting in and out of his memories of the past. His nurse, charged with the twenty-four-hour care of his patient, is blissfully unaware that his colleagues are using their various positions to skim money, in extraordinarily creative ways, from the top of their employer’s seemingly inexhaustible riches.

But when a family tragedy means that the nurse suddenly needs to find a fantastical sum of money fast, the dacha’s chef lets him in on the secret world of backhanders and bribes going on around him, and opens his eyes to a brewing war between the staff and the new housekeeper, the ruthless new sheriff in town.


A brilliantly cast modern-day Animal FarmThe Senility of Vladimir P. is a coruscating political fable that shows, through an honest man slipping his ethical moorings, how Putin has not only bankrupted his nation economically, but has also diminished it culturally and spiritually.

 

About Michael Honig

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Published August 2, 2016 by Pegasus Books. 329 pages
Genres: Humor & Entertainment, Literature & Fiction, Political & Social Sciences, History. Fiction
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Critic reviews for The Senility of Vladimir P
All: 4 | Positive: 3 | Negative: 1

Kirkus

Above average
on May 31 2016

Though Honig is a little heavy-handed with rhetorical questions, his study of what remains of a person once time takes its toll on the body and mind is a stunning take on the development of the corrupt and the corrupted. A surprisingly touching investigation of motive, duty, and greed.

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NY Times

Above average
Reviewed by Boris Fishman on Aug 19 2016

As Sheremetev sinks deeper and the novel enters its final, page-turning, stretch — Honig is an adroit plotter — the author loses faith in his readers and begins to spell out not only what’s happening but the extent of Russia’s tragedy.

Read Full Review of The Senility of Vladimir P | See more reviews from NY Times

Guardian

Good
Reviewed by Phoebe Taplin on Mar 12 2016

The Senility of Vladimir P is not subtle or stylistically complex, but it readably relates a story worth telling.

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Financial Times

Good
Reviewed by Lorna Cumming-Bruce on Apr 29 2016

Honig’s examination of moral complicity in present-day politics, along with the issue of palliative care, makes for an undeniably relevant — if somewhat daft — satire.

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Reader Rating for The Senility of Vladimir P
70%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 11 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


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