The Shrinking Man by Richard Matheson
(RosettaBooks into Film)

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Synopsis

In Matheson’s legendary tale, family man Scott Carey finds himself shrinking, slowly, day-by-day, inch-by-inch. While on vacation, he gets exposed to a radioactive cloud, the cause of this bizarre event. Scott once had an everyday existence as a husband and father, but now his shrinking shows no end in sight. He becomes a national spectacle, something worthy of newspaper headlines. As Carey shrinks smaller and smaller, his family become more and more unreachable giants, and the family cat becomes a predatory menace. In this world of disproportion, which grows more and more perilous with each passing day, Scott struggles to survive. He is pushed to the very limits of fear and existence.

As the story continues, Carey meets up with some circus performers and attempts to rebuild some semblance of a life. But since his shrinking never stops, all ideas of normal fade, and the threats never stop growing.

In 1958, The Shrinking Man won the Hugo award for that year’s best science fiction or fantasy dramatic presentation. It was also adapted into the film The Incredible Shrinking Man.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Richard Burton Matheson (born February 20th, 1926) is an American author and screenwriter working primarily in the fantasy, horror, and science fiction genres. Between 1950 and 1971, Matheson produced dozens of stories, frequently combining elements from different genres and making important contributions to the further development of modern horror. Matheson wrote fourteen episodes for the American television series The Twilight Zone, including the famous “Nightmare at 20,000 Feet.” Notably, Steven Spielberg’s first full length film (made for television) was based on the story Duel, for which Matheson also wrote the screenplay.

Matheson’s first novel, Someone is Bleeding, was published in 1953. His thirty novels since then include The Shrinking Man (filmed as The Incredible Shrinking Man, again adapted from Matheson’s own screenplay), and the novel I Am Legend (made into film as The Last Man on Earth, 1964; The Omega Man, 1971; and I Am Legend, 2007).

A new film based on Matheson’s story “Steel,” entitled Real Steel, is a major motion picture that was released in October 2011. His most recent novel, Other Kingdoms, appeared in March 2011.

ABOUT THE SERIES

From classic book to classic film, RosettaBooks has gathered some of most memorable books into film available. The selection is broad ranging and far reaching, with books from classic genre to cult classic to science fiction and horror and a blend of the two creating whole new genres like Richard Matheson’s The Shrinking Man. Classic works from Vonnegut, one of the greatest writers of the twentieth century, meet with E.M. Forster’s A Passage to India. Whether the work is centered in the here and now, in the past, or in some distant and almost unimaginable future, each work is lasting and memorable and award-winning.
 

About Richard Matheson

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Richard Matheson was born February 20th, 1926 in New Jersey. He started writing at the age of eight, and earned a degree in journalism in New York and Missouri and saw action during World War II. In 1950 he first was noticed as an upcoming writer-to-watch, starting with the short story Born of Man and Woman. He went on to produce seven novels and a large collection of short stories for various magazines, including some for Weird Tales and a lot of new Science Fiction magazines that were growing in popularity after the War, includingThe Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. Hollywood approached him, asking for rights to his novel The Shrinking Man. Seizing the chance he negotiated the chance to write the screenplay, and he began a long career in screenwriting and adapting. Matheson also scripted some of the best regarded episodes of The Twilight Zone and won an Edgar Allan Poe Award in 1973 for The Night Stalker. He has also won the World Fantasy Convention's Life Achievement Award, the Bram Stoker Award for Life Achievement, the Hugo Award, the Golden Spur Award, and the Writer's Guild Award. Several of Matheson's novels and stories have been made into films, including The Shrinking Man (filmed as "The Incredible Shrinking Man" in 1957), I Am Legend (filmed twice, once as "The Last Man on Earth" starring Vincent Price in 1964, and again as "The Omega Man" starring Charlton Heston in 1971), and Bid Time Return (filmed as "Somewhere in Time" starring Christopher Reeve and Jane Seymour in 1980). Matheson also wrote the scripts for Stephen Spielberg's first feature film, Duel; the TV-movie The Night Stalker; and several of Roger Corman's Edgar Allan Poe films, including House of Usher (1960), The Pit and the Pendulum (1961), and The Raven (1963). He also wrote the screenplay for Stir of Echoes with Kevin Bacon and What Dreams May Come with Robin Williams.
 
Published May 15, 2011 by RosettaBooks. 192 pages
Genres: Science Fiction & Fantasy, Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Horror. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Shrinking Man

Examiner

Matheson has been responsible for some of the greatest science fiction stories ever told like “I Am Legend,” various episodes of “The Twilight Zone” like “Nightmare at 20,000 Feet,” and the short story “Button, Button” which became the basis for the movie “The Box.” I think this movie represents...

Sep 02 2012 | Read Full Review of The Shrinking Man (RosettaBoo...

SF Site

His awards include the World Fantasy Lifetime Achievement Award, the Bram Stoker Award for Life Achievement, the Hugo Award, the Edgar Allan Poe Award, the Golden Spur Award, and the Writer's Guild Award.

| Read Full Review of The Shrinking Man (RosettaBoo...

Time Out New York

Not merely the best of Arnold's classic sci-fi movies of the '50s, but one of the finest films ever made in that genre.

| Read Full Review of The Shrinking Man (RosettaBoo...

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