The Southpaw by Mark Harris
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With The Southpaw, novelist Mark Harris begins the remarkable saga of a gifted baseball pitcher named Henry W. Wiggen, which would unfold in four novels over the course of some 27 years between the publication of The Southpaw (1952) and It Looked Like For Ever (1979). Harris frames The Southpaw in an irresistible way, letting the fictional hero Wiggen "tell" his own story in the vernacular--bad grammar, run-on sentences, the works. In fact, the title page tells the reader that The Southpaw is "by Henry W. Wiggen / Punctuation freely inserted and spelling greatly improved by Mark Harris."

Henry Wiggen is a beautiful athlete, but despite his talents and his natural grace, the unpretentious small-town boy reaches manhood by the same arduous route followed by most boys, complicated in his case by that very talent and grace, and the expectations they create in everyone. Wiggen is that rarest of fiction heroes, a certifiable good guy, without guile, who wants always to do the right thing. Even for him, the challenges posed by personal and professional needs sometimes seem to be too much, as the stakes in his career steadily rise. The Southpaw follows Wiggen from his early days all the way to the World Series, a winning story of a good man living an extraordinary life.

"By far the best 'serious' baseball novel published," the San Francisco Chronicle wrote of The Southpaw--a critical response that is frequently echoed in discussions of all four of Mark Harris' novels about Henry Wiggen. The Southpaw defines Wiggen, and Harris wields his vivid, stream of conscious style with wizardly skill. The acid test is whether the experience of The Southpaw encourages the reader to follow Wiggen's saga in Bang the Drum Slowly. Invariably, it does.


Mark Harris (1922) wrote novels for more than fifty years. He is best known for four novels about the life of major-league baseball player Henry W. Wiggen, including The Southpaw (1953) and Bang the Drum Slowly (1956) He also wrote the screenplay for the film version of Bang the Drum Slowly.

In 1946, Harris made a splash with his first novel Trumpet to the World, a book about a young black soldier who married a white woman. Many of Harris's other novels have dealt with academic life, and yet more of his novels are highly informed by autobiographical experience. Harris has also published a collection of his articles entitled Short Work of It, as well as the play Friedman and Son and a unique biography of Saul Bellow.

About Mark Harris

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Mark Harris is a former environmental columnist with the "Los Angeles Times Syndicate." His articles and essays have appeared in the "Chicago Tribune, E/The Environmental Magazine, Reader's Digest, " and "Hope." He lives with his family in Pennsylvania. Visit his website at
Published June 29, 2010 by RosettaBooks. 350 pages
Genres: Education & Reference, Sports & Outdoors, Literature & Fiction, Arts & Photography. Fiction

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