The Spy Who Came In from the Cold by John le Carre

78%

5 Critic Reviews

A domesday book of the cold war and the lonely anonymity of the double agent and it is all expertly chilling and exciting.
-Kirkus

Synopsis

John le Carré’s memoir, The Pigeon Tunnel: Stories from My Life, will be available from Viking in September 2016

John le Carré’s third novel—A #1 New York Times bestseller for 34 weeks—and the book that launched his career worldwide

In the shadow of the newly erected Berlin Wall, Alec Leamas watches as his last agent is shot dead by East German sentries. For Leamas, the head of Berlin Station, the Cold War is over. As he faces the prospect of retirement or worse—a desk job—Control offers him a unique opportunity for revenge. Assuming the guise of an embittered and dissolute ex-agent, Leamas is set up to trap Mundt, the deputy director of the East German Intelligence Service—with himself as the bait. In the background is George Smiley, ready to make the game play out just as Control wants.

Setting a standard that has never been surpassed, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold is a devastating tale of duplicity and espionage.


John le Carré’s Our Kind of Traitor is soon to be a major motion picture starring Ewan McGregor.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

About John le Carre

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JOHN LE CARRÉ, the author of twenty-two novels, is the pseudonym for David Cornwell, who was a member of the British Foreign Service from 1959 to 1964. Many of his books have been made into films, including The Constant Gardener; The Russia House; The Little Drummer Girl; and Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy.
 
Published January 18, 2012 by Penguin Books. 240 pages
Genres: Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Literature & Fiction, Education & Reference, Action & Adventure, Children's Books, Crime, Horror, Political & Social Sciences, Science & Math, Health, Fitness & Dieting. Fiction
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Critic reviews for The Spy Who Came In from the Cold
All: 5 | Positive: 5 | Negative: 0

Kirkus

Good
on Sep 27 2011

A domesday book of the cold war and the lonely anonymity of the double agent and it is all expertly chilling and exciting.

Read Full Review of The Spy Who Came In from the ... | See more reviews from Kirkus

Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by William Boyd on Jul 23 2010

...perhaps this is the first remarkable comment to make about The Spy, its cynicism is resolutely de nos jours. One forgets just how unsparing the book is, how the picture it paints of human motivations, human duplicities, human frailty seems presciently aware of all that we have learned and unlearned in the intervening decades.

Read Full Review of The Spy Who Came In from the ... | See more reviews from Guardian

The Bookbag

Excellent
Reviewed by Paul Curd on May 01 2009

The blurb on the back quotes J. B. Priestley: Superbly constructed, with an atmosphere of chilly hell. I would add that it is a terrific read, too. It really is the Carlsberg of espionage fiction: Probably the Best Spy Novel Ever Written.

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Pajiba

Above average

It ends on a poingnant note, never wasting a page along the way.

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Book Geeks

Above average
on Jan 23 2012

Le Carré brings the reader into his dark world of duplicity and deception, and piles lies upon lies until even we, the reader, doubt what we see and hear.

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Reader Rating for The Spy Who Came In from the Cold
81%

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