The Stonecutter by DEMI DEMI
(Chinese)

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Synopsis

In long-ago China, a stonecutter, who dreams of being rich, is granted his wish by an angel. But the greedy stonecutter continues to wish for more. Each time, the angel grants his wish--until one wish too many teaches him a valuable lesson. Demi's richly ornate illustrations perfectly complement her rendition of an old Chinese folk tale.
 

About DEMI DEMI

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Demi became fascinated with Buddhism at the age of three, when she chose a small golden statue of the Buddha at a five-and-dime store. At age twenty-one she was awarded a Fulbright scholarship to study art in India, where she walked in the footsteps of the Buddha. She has practiced Buddhism for twenty years, along with her husband, Tze-si Huang. In researching the art for "Buddha," she drew from Indian, Chinese, Japanese, Burmese, and Indonesian paintings, sculptures, and sutra illustrations, particularly Pahari and Chamba Indian miniature paintings. For the story of the Buddha's life, Demi relied on her library of more than 82,000 books, most of which relate to Buddhism. Demi is the author and illustrator of many books, including "The Empty Pot," "The Magic Tapestry," "The Firebird," and "The Magic Gold Fish," She lives in Carnation, Washington.
 
Published April 11, 1995 by Knopf Books for Young Readers.
Genres: Children's Books, Science Fiction & Fantasy. Non-fiction

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Kirkus Reviews

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A stonecutter experiences the angel-abetted metamorphoses into the people or objects he admires: Thus, he passes from stonecutter to rich man, governor, farmer, sun, cloud, wind, rock, and back to stonecutter.

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Publishers Weekly

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The prolific author/artist brings her characteristically luxurious taste to this folktale, a Chinese equivalent of The Fisherman and His Wife. Here, it is a stonecutter who is granted his wishes to be

Apr 03 1995 | Read Full Review of The Stonecutter: (Chinese)

Publishers Weekly

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Here, it is a stonecutter who is granted his wishes to be turned into ever more powerful entities--until he learns, predictably, that ``being a stonecutter is best after all.'' Burnished gold backgrounds made of Chinese silk fill each spread, canvases for Demi's delicate pen-and-ink drawings and ...

| Read Full Review of The Stonecutter: (Chinese)

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