The Swordfish and the Star by Gavin Knight
Life on Cornwall's Most Dangerous Stretch of Coast

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 1 Critic Review

Knight’s unregulated tone and slidings into quasi-fictional territory will not be to every reader’s taste, but as a cross-section of west Cornish lives, a celebration of brave eccentricity and a prose illustration of the way those lives overlap and interrelate, The Swordfish and the Star takes some beating.
-Guardian

Synopsis

The romance, danger and reality of life in a fishing community, from a highly acclaimed young writer.

The Penwith Peninsula in Cornwall is where the land ends. In The Swordfish and the Star Gavin Knight takes us into this huddle of grey roofs at the edge of the sea at the beginning of the 21st century. It is revealed as a microcosm of Britain, a Middlemarch, with the drama and increasing precariousness of life there resonating far beyond its shores.

Gavin Knight has caught the stories of dreamers and fighters, of the lost and the saved, the timeless and the new -- and above all, of those last frontiersmen, the Cornish fishermen. Cornwall and the seas around its coasts are brought to life, mixing pubs and drugs and sea spray, moonlit beaches and shattering storms, myth and urban myth. The result is an arresting tapestry of a place we thought we knew; the real Cornwall behind our holiday snaps and picture postcards.

Based on immersive research and rich with the voices of a cast of remarkable characters, this is an eye-opening, poignant account of life on Britain's most dangerous stretch of coastline from one of Britain's most promising young non-fiction writers.
 

About Gavin Knight

See more books from this Author
 
Published June 2, 2016 by Vintage Digital. 258 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, History, Travel. Non-fiction
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for The Swordfish and the Star
All: 1 | Positive: 0 | Negative: 1

Guardian

Below average
Reviewed by Patrick Gale on Jun 29 2016

Knight’s unregulated tone and slidings into quasi-fictional territory will not be to every reader’s taste, but as a cross-section of west Cornish lives, a celebration of brave eccentricity and a prose illustration of the way those lives overlap and interrelate, The Swordfish and the Star takes some beating.

Read Full Review of The Swordfish and the Star: L... | See more reviews from Guardian
×