The Tale-Teller by Susan Glickman

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...Glickman’s intelligence and superior narrative abilities have enabled her to transition skilfully from one genre to the other, and she is at the top of her game in both.
-National Post arts

Synopsis

A great story transcends the coldest winter.
The year is 1738. Jacques Lafargue, a wide-eyed young Frenchman, arrives in New
France aboard the Saint Michel. But before his Canadian adventure has a chance to
begin, he is detained at Quebec harbour by suspicious port officials. Their distrust
proves warranted: instead of a young man named Jacques Lafargue their captive turns
out to be a young woman named Esther Brandeau, and instead of answers to their
questions about who she is and where she came from, they are given tales of castaways
raised by apes, of blind lovelorn sailors and merciless pirates, of runaway slaves and
kindly desert nomads, and of other curiosities in a limitless world.
Few suspect the truth: Esther is a Jew, which by law prohibits her from entering
New France, and she is using her tale-telling to escape the restrictions placed upon
her race and gender. And no one - not even Esther herself - realizes the power
her stories have to open their hearts and minds to old dreams and new possibilities.
The Tale-Teller is a marvel. Susan Glickman takes readers on a journey of discovery
- starting with the fascinating true story of an obscure historical figure, and
continuing through an intimate and richly-detailed portrait of Canadian colonial
society, guided always by a map of wonders-to reveal timeless truths.

 

About Susan Glickman

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Born in Baltimore, Maryland, Susan Glickman grew up in Montreal and has lived in England, Greece, Mexico, and India. She is the author of The Violin Lover (winner of the Martin and Beatrice Fischer Prize in Fiction at the 2006 Canadian Jewish Book Awards), and The Picturesque and the Sublime: A Poetics of the Canadian Landscape (1998 winner of the Gabrielle Roy Award of the Association for Canadian and Quebec Literatures for the best book of English Canadian Literary Criticism) as well as six books of poetry and three children's books. Glickman currently lives in Toronto, where she teaches creative writing at the Chang School at Ryerson University and the School of Continuing Education at the University of Toronto, and works as a freelance editor.
 
Published July 28, 2012 by Cormorant Books. 256 pages
Genres: History, Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Critic reviews for The Tale-Teller
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National Post arts

Good
Reviewed by Sharon Abron Drache on Oct 19 2012

...Glickman’s intelligence and superior narrative abilities have enabled her to transition skilfully from one genre to the other, and she is at the top of her game in both.

Read Full Review of The Tale-Teller | See more reviews from National Post arts

National Post arts

Good
Reviewed by Sharon Abron Drache on Oct 19 2012

Like Margaret Atwood, Glickman’s intelligence and superior narrative abilities have enabled her to transition skilfully from one genre to the other, and she is at the top of her game in both.

Read Full Review of The Tale-Teller | See more reviews from National Post arts

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