The Tell-Tale Brain by V. S. Ramachandran
A Neuroscientist's Quest for What Makes Us Human

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 10 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

"A profound intriguing and compelling guide to the intricacies of the human brain." —Oliver Sacks


In this landmark work, V. S. Ramachandran investigates strange, unforgettable cases—from patients who believe they are dead to sufferers of phantom limb syndrome. With a storyteller’s eye for compelling case studies and a researcher’s flair for new approaches to age-old questions, Ramachandran tackles the most exciting and controversial topics in brain science, including language, creativity, and consciousness.
 

About V. S. Ramachandran

See more books from this Author
V. S. Ramachandran is the director of the Center for Brain and Cognition and a Distinguished Professor with the Psychology Department and Neurosciences Program at the University of California, San Diego. He lives in Del Mar, California.
 
Published January 17, 2011 by W. W. Norton & Company. 384 pages
Genres: Health, Fitness & Dieting, Nature & Wildlife, Science & Math, Professional & Technical, Self Help. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Tell-Tale Brain

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

The roster of syndromes grows to include language and memory disorders, cases in which a stroke patient denies the existence of a paralyzed limb, a patient recognizes his mother’s face but says she is an impostor, or a patient who believes himself dead.

| Read Full Review of The Tell-Tale Brain: A Neuros...

The New York Times

See more reviews from this publication

For example, in the case of a young man who awoke from a coma after a car crash believing that his mother was an imposter, Ramachandran believes that there was damage to a neural route that takes visual information to his amygdala (a part of the brain involved in investing objects with emotional ...

Jan 28 2011 | Read Full Review of The Tell-Tale Brain: A Neuros...

The Guardian

See more reviews from this publication

While quirks of language are not uncommon following brain injury, I still have no clear idea why my Italian became fluent or why the effect lingers to this day: a real brain teaser.

Feb 20 2011 | Read Full Review of The Tell-Tale Brain: A Neuros...

The Wall Street Journal

See more reviews from this publication

Neuroscience can explain many brain functions, but not the mystery of consciousness

Jan 08 2011 | Read Full Review of The Tell-Tale Brain: A Neuros...

The Telegraph

McGilchrist, for whom certainty is the greatest of illusions, has produced an absolutely convincing narrative of who we are, which at the same time reiterates the truth behind Ramachandran’s lament: “Ah, how little we know about the brain!” The Tell-Tale Brain: Unlocking the Mystery o...

Jan 07 2011 | Read Full Review of The Tell-Tale Brain: A Neuros...

Scotsman.com

He goes to real-life clinical cases for evidence of exactly how the brain behaves in action or examines the experimental record for clues to the wonderful intricacy and astonishing scope of the human mind.

Jan 14 2011 | Read Full Review of The Tell-Tale Brain: A Neuros...

The New York Review of Books

The point was that the brain does not wear its functions on its face in the way the gross anatomy of the body does: you can see by casual inspection that legs do the walking but not that the occipital cortex does the seeing, so it is necessary to fall back on observing the effects of injury (as I...

Jun 23 2011 | Read Full Review of The Tell-Tale Brain: A Neuros...

Science News

To him, drama lurks in the anatomy of each part of the brain, so that a description of the essential, if primitive, brain stem is punctuated with: “A hemorrhage from even a tiny artery supplying this region can spell instant death.” Never averse to speculation, Ramachandran argue...

| Read Full Review of The Tell-Tale Brain: A Neuros...

Psychology Today

It can’t reasonably be claimed that mirror neurons made us imitate and empathise with each other, if the way we choose to behave instead dictates the way our mirror neurons work.

Dec 10 2012 | Read Full Review of The Tell-Tale Brain: A Neuros...

https://www.psychologytoday.com

Mirror neuron fans generally accept that action understanding is possible without corresponding mirror neuron activity, but they say mirror neurons bring an extra depth to understanding.

Dec 10 2012 | Read Full Review of The Tell-Tale Brain: A Neuros...

Reader Rating for The Tell-Tale Brain
71%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 256 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×