The Tin Forest by Helen Ward

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Synopsis

In the middle of a windswept wasteland full of discarded scrap metal lives a sad and lonely old man. In spite of his gloomy surroundings, he dreams every night of a lively forest full of trees, birds, and animals. When he finds a broken light fixture that looks like a flower, his imagination is sparked. He begins to build a tin forest, branch by branch, creature by creature. In time, real birds arrive, bearing seeds, and soon the artificial forest is taken over by living vines and animals until it looks just like the forest of the old man's dreams.

The rich, detailed illustrations and the lyrical text carry an important, empowering message for children and adults alike: No matter where you live or what your circumstances are, where there is imagination, there is hope.
 

About Helen Ward

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Helen Ward and Wayne Anderson haveworked together on a number of splendidpicture books. Their work has been hailed as“exquisitely detailed . . . touching” by PublishersWeekly and “infused with natural wonder,”“beautifully illustrated,” and “stunning” byBooklist. Ms. Ward and Mr. Anderson live inEngland.Helen Ward and Wayne Anderson haveworked together on a number of splendidpicture books. Their work has been hailed as“exquisitely detailed . . . touching” by PublishersWeekly and “infused with natural wonder,”“beautifully illustrated,” and “stunning” byBooklist. Ms. Ward and Mr. Anderson live inEngland.
 
Published March 1, 2001 by Templar Publishing. 32 pages
Genres: Nature & Wildlife, Children's Books, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

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In this parable from Ward (The Animals’ Christmas Carol, above, etc.), an old man living in a vast, gray wasteland of “other people’s garbage and bad weather” is driven by dreams to recycle it all into a forest of steel trees and tin creatures.

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Publishers Weekly

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"Living alone in the midst of environmental devastation, an old man refuses to resign himself to the junkyard views that surround him," wrote PW .

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Publishers Weekly

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With his bald pate, white whiskers, spectacles and tattered work clothes, the old man is a grandfatherly figure whose human warmth (represented by the tinge of color on his flesh and clothes) puts him in stark contrast to the bleak world he inhabits.

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