The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse by Bernadette Watts

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Synopsis

When the town mouse and the country mouse visit each other, they find they prefer very different ways of life.
 

About Bernadette Watts

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Bernadette Watts has loved to draw since her childhood in England. She created her first picture book under the influence of Beatrix Potter. Watts studied at the Maidstone Art School in Kent and is the illustrator of North South fairy tales The Snow Queen and The Ugly Duckling. Though many modern scholars dispute his existence, Aesop's life was chronicled by first century Greek historians who wrote that Aesop, or Aethiop, was born into Greek slavery in 620 B.C. Freed because of his wit and wisdom, Aesop supposedly traveled throughout Greece and was employed at various times by the governments of Athens and Corinth. Some of Aesop's most recognized fables are The Tortoise and the Hare, The Fox and the Grapes, and The Ant and the Grasshopper. His simple but effective morals are widely used and illustrated for children.
 
Published August 1, 1998 by NorthSouth. 32 pages
Genres: Nature & Wildlife, Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse

Kirkus Reviews

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Watts's bland version of the fable is so distant from the original that what they have in common is hard to discern, and no moral-of-the-story needs apply.

Oct 01 1998 | Read Full Review of The Town Mouse and the Countr...

Publishers Weekly

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Watts (Harvey Hare, Postman Extraordinaire) makes uniformly pretty pictures of sweet little pink-eared mice, but her story, devoid of any element of danger when the mice visit one another's environs,

Aug 03 1998 | Read Full Review of The Town Mouse and the Countr...

Publishers Weekly

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Watts (Harvey Hare, Postman Extraordinaire) makes uniformly pretty pictures of sweet little pink-eared mice, but her story, devoid of any element of danger when the mice visit one another's environs, makes for a rather bland retelling of the Aesop fable.

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