The Town that Moved to Mexico by Arthur Herzog III

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Synopsis

The small towns of Hinchville, CA, and La Lacrimosa, Mexico, dispute ownership of a small strip of land on the border between them. When an earthquake causes a bizarre landslide, and several of the houses in Hinchville end up in La Lacrimosa's town square, the minor dispute becomes an international incident.

The Mexican mayor turns the tables on the Americans by forcing them to perform domestic work for meager wages, while the mayor of Hinchville tries to figure out how to get his house back to California. When rumor of an airborne chemical weapon manufactured in the Mexican town reaches the U.S. State Department, military forces for each country assemble on the border, preparing for a potential conflict. But the longer the Americans stay there, the more they come to realize they have more in common with the Mexicans than they originally expected. But can they avoid military action?

 

About Arthur Herzog III

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Arthur Herzog III was born in Manhattan on April 6, 1927. He received a bachelor's degree in English literature from Stanford University in 1949 and a master's degree in English literature at Columbia University in 1951. He soon became a freelance magazine writer. During his lifetime, he wrote 16 novels including IQ 83 and Orca, two short story collections, and nine nonfiction books including Vesco, The Church Trap, 17 Days: The Katie Beers Story, and The War-Peace Establishment. His novel, The Swarm was published in 1974 and was adapted into a movie starring Michael Caine in 1978. He also wrote for numerous magazines including Esquire, Harper's, The Nation, and The New York Times Magazine. He died due to complications of a stroke on May 26, 2010 at the age of 83.
 
Published February 27, 2012 by Leslie Mandel Enterprises, Inc. 218 pages
Genres: Political & Social Sciences, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Literature & Fiction, Science Fiction & Fantasy, War. Fiction

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