The Trial of Madame Caillaux by Edward Berenson

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Synopsis

Edward Berenson recounts the trial of Henriette Caillaux, the wife of a powerful French cabinet minister, who murdered her husband's enemy Le Figaro editor Gaston Calmette, in March 1914, on the eve of World War I. In analyzing this momentous event, Berenson draws a fascinating portrait of Belle Epoque politics and culture.
 

About Edward Berenson

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Edward Berenson is Professor of History at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the author of Populist Religion and Left-Wing Politics in France, 1830-1852 (1984).
 
Published January 15, 1992 by University of California Press. 311 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Political & Social Sciences, Travel, War, Crime, Romance, Science Fiction & Fantasy. Non-fiction

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A skillful take on France's belle Çpoque, using the celebrated 1914 trial of Henriette Caillaux for the murder of Le Figaro editor Gaston Calmette as a springboard to examine a wide range of contemporary topics.

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Publishers Weekly

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Berenson, professor of history at UCLA, writes a gender micro-history of the Belle Epoque in France (1890-1914) by examining the trial and acquittal of Madame Henriette Caillaux. On March 14, 1914 she

Jan 01 1992 | Read Full Review of The Trial of Madame Caillaux

Publishers Weekly

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Berenson, professor of history at UCLA, writes a gender micro-history of the Belle Epoque in France (1890-1914) by examining the trial and acquittal of Madame Henriette Caillaux.

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